Inside designer Martin Brudnizki’s playfully exaggerated British country retreat

Not so long ago, an aristocratic neighbor passed by interior designer and designer Martin Brudnizki’s new country home in the Sussex wilderness. Wide-eyed, he was obviously stunned by the ensemble of orchids: shades piped with ruffles, fabrics as profusely flowery as any herbaceous border in midsummer, shards of mirrored glass. Passing from the mashed English peas entrance hall to the goldenrod yellow salon covered in a thick layer of artwork, including a heroic depiction of Charles II parked above the drinks table, he paused, peered and thought, then settled himself down on an oversized pink ottoman. After a while the visitor said, thoughtfully, “That’s a lot to take in. “

It was a comment that delighted Brudnizki. Indeed, this is precisely the kind of reaction the AD100 star and her life and business partner Jonathan Brook expect when they open the Nile Gates on weekends. “People don’t know where to look,” said Brudnizki, smiling. “I like this utter confusion.” It is his horror vacui responds to play-it-safe decors. “Minimalism has nothing to say,” the designer continues, adding, “It’s a fantasy of English Arcadian life by a Swede who didn’t grow up in homes like this. It’s an extreme point of view, but it’s not for a client; it’s for me and Jonathan, and we wanted to be pretty crazy. Brook calls out: “Anyone else would have brought brown furniture and chintz curtains. You need an outside influence to do something different, and people forget that traditional English design and architecture is teeming with foreign influences, from Andrea Palladio to Giacomo Leoni.

A small portrait of a 19th century Roman soldier hangs in the master bedroom.

Henri bourne

A verdant tapestry from Hines of Oxford defines the kitchen dining area.

Henri bourne

COUNTRY ESTATE PINK PLATE

LIN LUSTMORE BY JEAN MONRO

Trade

PAPER-MACHINE VASE WITH BIRD BY MARK GAGNON

Anyone familiar with Brudnizki’s business plans, including his hard-hitting redesign and motif on the motif of the venerable London club Annabel, knows that a certain level of frenzy is expected. In the couple’s apartment – which occupies much of the ground floor of Binderton House, a 17th-century keyhole that belonged to former Prime Minister Anthony Eden – the general effect is as if John Fowler, the creator of taste Colefax & Fowler, had dropped a little acid.

Why hang a picture on a decorative blue bow when you can do it with a dozen, then dress them up with pink ribbons? Or adorn a bedroom with a wall-to-wall linen print of life-size digitals under a ceiling as pink as a candied almond? When Brook and Brudnizki decided to brown the Georgian fireplace in the living room, the understated accent that had been planned quickly transformed into a mother’s vein that crept up to the cornice of the room. Few would add lampshades to a Venetian chandelier – after all, these fixtures are opulent enough already – but the merry gentlemen of Binderton House have done just that, each shade of pink silk daringly gathered and wrapped in rows of fringe. fluffy blue. “They are like hats,” explains Brudnizki. “And they are so much fun.”

18th century engravings of the kings and queens of England line the walls of the bath. Drummonds tub, sink and accessories designed by Brudnizki; Visual Comfort suspensions.

Henri bourne

A guest bedroom is dressed in And Objects fabrics for Christopher Farr. Pendant light by And Objects for Urban Electric Co.

Henri bourne

ONBOARD LINEN BY AND OBJECTS FOR CHRISTOPHER FARR CLOTH

Trade

PAPER-MACHINE VASE WITH BIRD BY MARK GAGNON

OTTERBOURNE SLIPPER CHAIR

HAND-TIE WOOL & SILK TIBETAN RUFFLE IN RUFFLE BY MARTIN BRUDNIZKI FOR THE RUG COMPANY

As the designer observes: “Most people are shocked when they see the place for the first time, but at the end of the evening, they are sprawled on the sofa. What I really like about maximalism is that it’s all about camouflage. You feel hidden in a room full of patterns and things. People come in and disappear, like in a Vuillard painting. The value of an art gallery, from the great masters to what Brudnizki describes as tat, has been incorporated into the living room like pieces of a puzzle. “We started with three large canvases, but Martin wanted to fill in the walls, so we created a grid with a portrait of Zoffany, capriccios and landscapes, and added miniatures to fill in the gaps,” says Brook. Adds Brudnizki, “I hate to see empty spaces.”


Source link

Comments are closed.