Interior Home Design – My Rumah http://myrumah.net/ Mon, 01 Aug 2022 12:29:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://myrumah.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Interior Home Design – My Rumah http://myrumah.net/ 32 32 Sienna Miller’s Cottage in the English Countryside is a Charming Retreat | Architectural Summary https://myrumah.net/sienna-millers-cottage-in-the-english-countryside-is-a-charming-retreat-architectural-summary/ Mon, 01 Aug 2022 12:04:09 +0000 https://myrumah.net/sienna-millers-cottage-in-the-english-countryside-is-a-charming-retreat-architectural-summary/ When actress Sienna Miller first saw a 16th-century thatched-roof cottage in Buckinghamshire, England, she fell in love with it. “It was a time when I was getting a lot of press attention and I wanted a place to get away from it all. I bought the house on a whim, it offers sanctuary. I also […]]]>

When actress Sienna Miller first saw a 16th-century thatched-roof cottage in Buckinghamshire, England, she fell in love with it. “It was a time when I was getting a lot of press attention and I wanted a place to get away from it all. I bought the house on a whim, it offers sanctuary. I also wanted a place where family and friends could get together. It has a nurturing feeling; it’s a house with a heart,” she says.

When not acting in movies and TV series or on stage (including a role in the Apple TV+ series Extrapolations, set to debut next year), Miller, his daughter, friends and family are having a glorious time at home. And for more than a decade, she left the faded chintz-filled interior with her engineered flooring mostly intact. During the pandemic, however, when the urge arose to restore the house, she knew exactly who to call. “I wanted a Gaby house! says Miller, referring to the homes of his good friend Gaby Dellal in London and Cornwall, with their wonderful eclectic interiors where vintage fabrics and kilims, industrial accessories and other intimate elements mingle in unexpected unions that exude warmth, impeccable taste and a sincere character.

Sienna Miller, wearing a Gucci hat, Gabriela Hearst dress and Grenson boots.

Dellal, a film and theater director by profession, was happy to take on the project and threw himself into the work with enthusiasm, commuting between London and the site while Miller, who was born in the United States and grew up in the UK, was grounded. in New York during the lockdown. “What was beautiful was that she just trusted me, and we had an agreement that she wasn’t allowed to go for six months until I finished the project,” explains Dellal.

In the cozy, the Rose Uniacke sofa is dressed in a fuchsia donegal tweed from Sequana. Wall lights including an antique scissor lamp and a Victorian sconce were used as the ceilings are low. Beni Ourain rug by Francois Gilles Carpets.

A farmhouse table and chairs provide a gathering place in the kitchen. Vinterior vintage lighting; the Lacanche range; tile from Bert & May.

The restoration process is as much about friendship as it is about design vision. “I gave Sienna her first job right here at my kitchen table. She had never acted before, and I remember our meeting vividly – she had a cold and was wearing a balaclava and a big sweater and I fell in love with her. I made her first film, called The path, with Paul Nicholls, about kids on motorcycles, and his career catapulted from there,” says Dellal, who obviously has an eye for talent.

This, however, was not a simple makeover. Dellal, who had visited the house several times, knew its bones and could see its true potential. She first undertook to empty the house from top to bottom: cupboards, boxes, clothes, cupboards, furniture and mattresses included. After this gigantic cleanup, Dellal hired builders who began replacing all the lattice windows, ripping up the floors, and opening up the eaves of Miller’s low-ceilinged bedroom. Outside, a gravel driveway and parking area have been demolished to make way for a poetic wildflower meadow with a simple perimeter passing track for cars. An old garage has also been transformed into a guest bedroom for family and friends who are welcome to stay even when Miller is in New York (she recently purchased a West Village townhouse) or filming.

An outdoor seating area.

1970s wallpaper from Secondhand Rose in New York wraps a tub.

A bathtub from The Architectural Forum stands behind a Victorian fabric-covered screen in a corner of Miller’s bedroom.

“When I took on the project, I told Sienna that I would change everything – floors, windows, doors included,” says Dellal, who embarked on the multi-pronged sourcing job of locating suppliers, artisans and dealers across the UK, USA and Turkey. “I’ve found the people in the interior business to be so lovely,” says Dellal, whose own black book of dealers and suppliers has grown over all his years of directing and producing rich films. in detail and in atmosphere.

Twenty salvaged Crittall windows were found on eBay; dark brown floorboards from the Georgian and Victorian era were discovered at Norfolk Antique & Reclamation and other specialists; and the perfect fennel green kitchen tiles were discovered at Bert & May. Black and white Carrara for the kitchen worktops were sourced from Retrouvius and Verona Marble respectively, and a lovely pair of patio doors that magically filter the light come from The French House in York. “All the beams were black, which I can’t stand. So we burned black – it’s so much softer,” says Dellal, who envisioned much lighter, more open spaces with colors and textures flowing smoothly from room to room.

]]>
Is “Dream Home Makeover” scripted or is the Netflix series real? https://myrumah.net/is-dream-home-makeover-scripted-or-is-the-netflix-series-real/ Sat, 30 Jul 2022 01:55:20 +0000 https://myrumah.net/is-dream-home-makeover-scripted-or-is-the-netflix-series-real/ Picture via Netflix Dream home makeover quickly became one of Netflix’s biggest hits. First landing on screens in 2020, it has established itself as one of the hottest new reality shows. And its popularity only increased when its second season launched in 2021. But many fans wonder if the show is real or scripted. Here’s […]]]>

Picture via Netflix

Dream home makeover quickly became one of Netflix’s biggest hits. First landing on screens in 2020, it has established itself as one of the hottest new reality shows. And its popularity only increased when its second season launched in 2021. But many fans wonder if the show is real or scripted.

Here’s everything you need to know about this wildly popular interior design show.

What is a Dream Home Makeover?

The show follows Shea and Syd McGee of interior design firm Studio McGee. Each episode sees them helping a client bring their interior design and home improvement dreams to fruition. Studio McGee guides the client through the process and helps clients tailor their space to their needs and personality.

Unlike previous shows that used the same format, Dream home makeover puts a lot of emphasis on the couple themselves, and the show mixes design with documentary elements that document the couple’s family life outside of work.

Is Dream Home Makeover scripted?

According to Studio McGee, the series is unscripted. In a blog post on the company’s website titled “10 Fun Facts About Dream Home Makeover,” the company states, “Our show was completely improvised!”

The post then goes on to explain that:

“We were really lucky that our actions represent what our real process actually looks like. What you’ll see on this show is true to how we communicate with our customers, work with contractors, and collaborate with our team.

In an interview with The Salt Lake Tribune, Shea and Syd McGee build on this answer, explaining that they aimed to mirror the reality of home design as much as possible. Shea tells the publication that:

“The most important thing for us is that we wanted to make sure that the show was our normal work product – that there wasn’t a big difference between the show and the feeling you get watching our webisodes or our Instagram or whatever we produce. .”

However, that doesn’t mean that everything viewers see is the complete truth. Obviously, a show like Dream home makeover can’t show a full renovation in real time, so things have to be cut and edited to fit within the constraints of the TV format. In the interview with The Salt Lake Grandstandthe pair explain this by saying:

“There’s always magic on TV, but for the most part we wanted to be able to show the design process as it happens. And show more realistic budgets. The budgets aren’t like other budgets in television, but it is also because we are more truthful.

On top of that, some elements of the process are modified for TV. The main thing is that the show surprises the client with the end result, capturing their raw emotion when they see the redesign for the first time. Something Studio McGee doesn’t do for its non-TV customers, as those customers tend to watch the redesign as it happens.

shea notes:

“It’s an experience I don’t have outside of the living room because they’re there while we’re putting the furniture together.”

So, while the show is unscripted, there are some slight deviations from reality to make the format work. However, the resulting interactions with customers and homes are very real.

]]>
Developers focus on work-from-home gear, next-gen NIMBY and more https://myrumah.net/developers-focus-on-work-from-home-gear-next-gen-nimby-and-more/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 22:12:16 +0000 https://myrumah.net/developers-focus-on-work-from-home-gear-next-gen-nimby-and-more/ Yearning for more in-person connection, many homeowners are turning to conversation pits as a renewed symbol of intimacy in interior design. Whatever happens next, stay in the know with our weekly roundup of headlines, launches and events, recommended reading and more. Economic news Responding to changing preferences for remote working, residential real estate developers are […]]]>

Yearning for more in-person connection, many homeowners are turning to conversation pits as a renewed symbol of intimacy in interior design. Whatever happens next, stay in the know with our weekly roundup of headlines, launches and events, recommended reading and more.

Economic news

Responding to changing preferences for remote working, residential real estate developers are integrating elevated work-from-home amenities into new luxury rental properties across the country. New features include private offices, conference rooms, task lighting, wall-mounted monitors, podcasting booths and high-speed internet, the cost of which is either included in the rent or available for an additional fee. As The New York Times reports, the move is part of a trend accelerated by the pandemic, in which developers have started adding space for offices and work equipment in new construction. The demand for such features can only continue to grow: according to a survey conducted by the Pew Research Center earlier this year, 59% of employees are still working remotely, and 78% of this group want to continue to do so after the pandemic. , compared to 64% two years ago.

According to the National Association of Realtors, the median sale price for an existing U.S. home hit $416,000 in June, the highest since records began in 1999. The Wall Street Journal reports. Recent market conditions have led to a slowdown in activity, with almost 15% of home purchase deals on hold, at a rate not seen since the pandemic disruption of April 2020. Although demand remains sustained for now, with properties remaining on the market for an average of 14 days last month (the shortest period since 2011), purchases could fall in the coming months if mortgage applications continue to fall as they have done so for the past three consecutive years. weeks. Currently, applications are at their lowest level in 22 years, in part due to interest rate hikes by the Federal Reserve aimed at curbing inflation.

Operations have resumed at the Port of Oakland after a week of protests that left cargo stranded on ships, docks and warehouses, straining the supply chain and prompting some ships to reroute to different ports, Reuters reports. The protests began last week in response to California’s new “gig worker” law, which would require many businesses that rely on self-employed workers to reclassify those independent contractors as employees – a distinction that, according to owners of truck companies who protest, would force them to bear heavy additional costs. . Port leaders and police have now restricted protesters to designated ‘free speech zones’, allowing cargo shipments to restart at California’s third-busiest port and busiest agricultural export hub .

Construction startup Vantem has announced plans to build 15 factories across the United States by 2029 to manufacture prefab modular housing units, Archinect reports. The expansion will be fueled by capital from the company’s recent Series A funding round, led by Breakthrough Energy Ventures, founded by Bill Gates, and will allow Vantem to expand production of its proprietary design – a product of low cost, net zero construction that does not require steel or wood reinforcements. Joining startups like Vancouver’s Nexii Building Solutions and Bjarke Ingels’ Nabr in the race to disrupt the construction industry, Vantem expects each of the new facilities to produce 1 million square feet of homes per year.

Launches & Collaborations

The Healthy Materials Lab at Parsons School of Design has launched the third season of its podcast Traces of matter. The new iteration will explore the “mysteries of the mycelium” as a mycologist John Michelotti trips to the Catskill Mountains to study the properties of fungi and their potential to produce healthier housing, materials and food systems.

Pottery Barn has launched The Accessible Home, a new product line focused on inclusive design that aims to serve people with disabilities or injuries, as well as the aging community on site. The collection includes a range of bathroom, upholstery, office, dining room, bedroom and lighting products with added accessibility features, for example, the Irving remote control recliner and desk Pacific wheelchair accessible.

The Novogratz have teamed up with Bed, Bath & Beyond for a Back to College collectionCourtesy of Novogratz

husband and wife duo Robert and Cortney Novogratz of The Novogratz has partnered with Bed, Bath & Beyond for a curated collection of back-to-college items. The colorful product line includes furniture, decor, bedding and bathware solutions suitable for dorms, apartments and small living spaces.

Shutterfly partners with four influencers, TikTok’s viral personality Brittany Broskientrepreneur and dating expert Serena Kerriganactor and author Elsa Majimboand actor and digital creator chris olson—for the launch of a new initiative called the Shutterfly Collective. The program will pair each social media personality with an independent artist on Spoonflower, the home decor marketplace owned by Shutterfly, to create a limited-edition capsule collection, featuring original designs on coffee mugs, blankets, journals and pillows.

Collectible art and design fair Salon Art + Design has announced the list of exhibitors for the 11th edition of the event, which will be held at the Park Avenue Armory in New York City from November 10-14. Along with a mix of returning exhibitors, new additions to this year’s cohort include Armel Soyer, Boccara Gallery, Galerie Artempo, Galerie Carole Decombe, Galerie Scene Ouverte, Galerie Yves Gastou, Garde and Le Lab.

recommended reading

When Laura Mauldin, a sociology professor at the University of Connecticut who studies caregiving and living with a disability, began conducting research remotely during the pandemic, she noticed the ingenious ways in which people with disabilities hacked into their workspaces. life. Using household items like zip ties, painter’s tape and dry erase boards, they created accessible furniture, rooms and appliances to better meet their daily needs. The discovery led to the creation of Disability at Home, a website that exposes the ableist approach of mainstream design companies, which do not provide adequate options for people with disabilities, such as Nate Berg reports for fast company. “We don’t want innovation. We want infrastructure”, defender of disability and design liz jackson recount fast company. “The way we often talk about disability is that it’s not really about the solution, but more about the promise. So what happens when you start asking what the solution is without any techno-utopian promise? »

A new generation of first-time home buyers has emerged during the pandemic, with recent research by Freddie Mac revealing that the federally-backed mortgage lender has funded the highest level of loans for first-time buyers since it began tracking these measures in 1994. As Demsas of Jerusalem written for Atlanticthis push combined with uncertain market conditions could indicate the rise of a new class of NIMBY, an acronym for Not In My Backyard – a phenomenon emerging in part due to homeowners desperately trying to maintain the value of their property.

Developers focus on work-from-home gear, next-gen NIMBY and more

Sister Parish Design fabrics, wallpapers and lifestyle products now available in Palm Beach, FloridaCourtesy of Sister Parish Design

Showroom representation

Sister Parish Design fabrics, wallpapers and lifestyle products are now available in Palm Beach, Florida through an exclusive partnership with full-service showroom Well Made Home. Professional customers and customers without a design license in the region will be able to purchase the brand’s items in person, with the selection available including best-selling fabric prints as well as new introductions, as well as performance fabrics, wallcoverings in grass fabric and hand-painted wallpapers.

In memory

Designer and industry leader Scott Kohler, founder of North Carolina-based design/build company Dream Kitchen Builders, has died. As an industry veteran and licensed contractor for 28 years, Koehler was active with the National Kitchen & Bath Association, reports KBB Online, and held accreditations as a Certified Kitchen Designer and the National Association of Home. Builders. Koehler has also been recognized for his significant contributions to the industry: in 2020, he was honored as a commendable pick in the NKBA’s Person of the Year contest. Koehler is survived by his wife, Gwen; his extended family; and his grandson.

Homepage photo: This week, Pottery Barn launched The Accessible Home, a new product line focused on inclusive design that aims to serve people with disabilities or injuries, as well as the aging community on site. | Courtesy of Pottery Barn

]]>
6 Victorian Homes That Balance Aged Grandeur With Contemporary Taste https://myrumah.net/6-victorian-homes-that-balance-aged-grandeur-with-contemporary-taste/ Fri, 22 Jul 2022 19:04:59 +0000 https://myrumah.net/6-victorian-homes-that-balance-aged-grandeur-with-contemporary-taste/ In 2012, London antiques dealer Will Fisher was driving around Spitalfields in London’s East End when he spotted a sad, dejected building with a ‘For Sale’ sign outside. Heartbroken by a previous sale of an 18th-century Huguenot home in the area that was falling into his twenties, he seized this as his moment. Although this […]]]>

In 2012, London antiques dealer Will Fisher was driving around Spitalfields in London’s East End when he spotted a sad, dejected building with a ‘For Sale’ sign outside. Heartbroken by a previous sale of an 18th-century Huguenot home in the area that was falling into his twenties, he seized this as his moment. Although this is his second home in London – and in many ways incongruous – sometimes with a home purchase there is higher real estate power.

Happiest when immersed in a project, Fisher, owner of upholstery boutique Pimlico, was looking for a repairman he could breathe new life into. “I needed to vent a pent-up desire to renovate a house,” he says with a smile, explaining that every corner of his existing home was decorated to the nth degree.

And there was a lot of work to do. Built in the early 20th century, the former Victorian/Edwardian wigmaker’s house was in a state of disrepair. “There’s nothing like seeing an empty building with nothing in it for the first time. You realize the Herculean task ahead of you. Also why you were the buyer and no one else,” Fisher says. Exciting versus terrorized? “It’s a crazy thrill of both.” —Claire Bingham

Carpentry makes the main stage

Gowing has kept things simplified in the living room, as the original pitch pine panels keep the room sufficiently busy. Bespoke velvet curtains and cushions from Scarlett Gowing Interiors soften the space – they’re also practical in the winter with such a large house to heat. Plaster light fixtures, as well as brass and glass shelves, are also part of his homeware collection, paired here with Bastiano and Cappellini sofas.

Photo: Paul Raeside

Structurally stunning with stunning proportions, this home built in 1879 has all the defining features of the Victorian period, but there is something different going on here. Any hint of the stuffiness of the era is countered by a clean contemporary design, and the upstairs private rooms feel soft and intimate unlike the open spaces downstairs.

Taking over the renovation of this home in St. Leonards-on-Sea in East Sussex, interior designer Scarlett Gowing had quite the challenge. The nearly derelict Grade II listed property has undergone many incarnations over the years (it has been a convalescent home, language school and drug rehabilitation centre) and in the process has lost any semblance of the family home that she once was. Also, the fear factor was high. “It was a big ask,” Gowing says of how she approached the renovation. “The house had lost its soul: all the stained glass windows were broken and covered with boarding and many doors were bricked up to create smaller rooms.” So she went back to the original floor plan to bring the house back to life. —Claire Bingham

]]>
CO Builders Association Announces 2022 Tour of Homes Winners https://myrumah.net/co-builders-association-announces-2022-tour-of-homes-winners/ Wed, 20 Jul 2022 23:06:23 +0000 https://myrumah.net/co-builders-association-announces-2022-tour-of-homes-winners/ BEND, Ore. (KTVZ) — The Central Oregon Builders Association has announced the winners of the 35th annual Tour of Homes: Green Building AwardUnder $799,000 – Arbor Builders #19$800,000-$999,000 – Stone Bridge Homes NW #14$1,000,000+ – Momentasize Construction #16 Less than $500Best Architectural Design – MonteVista Homes #1Best Feature – ‘Covered Patio’ – MonteVista Homes #1Best […]]]>

BEND, Ore. (KTVZ) — The Central Oregon Builders Association has announced the winners of the 35th annual Tour of Homes:

Green Building Award
Under $799,000 – Arbor Builders #19
$800,000-$999,000 – Stone Bridge Homes NW #14
$1,000,000+ – Momentasize Construction #16


Less than $500
Best Architectural Design – MonteVista Homes #1
Best Feature – ‘Covered Patio’ – MonteVista Homes #1
Best Interior Finish – MonteVista Homes #1
Best Kitchen – MonteVista Homes #1
Best Landscaping – MonteVista Homes #1
Best Master Suite – MonteVista Homes #1
Best of Show – MonteVista Homes #1
Best Value – MonteVista Homes #1

$525,000 – $550,000
Best Architectural Design – Arbor Builders #19
Best Feature – ‘Backyard’ – MonteVista Homes #2
Best Interior Finish – MonteVista Homes #2
Best Kitchen – MonteVista Homes #2
Best Landscaping – MonteVista Homes #2
Best Master Suite – MonteVista Homes #2
Best of Show – MonteVista Homes #2
Best Value – MonteVista Homes #2

$600,000 – $625,000
Best Architectural Design – Woodhill Homes #8
Best Feature – ‘ADU’ – Woodhill Homes #8
Best Interior Finish – Woodhill Homes #8
Best Kitchen – Hayden Homes #6
Best Landscaping – Hayden Homes #5
Best Master Suite – Hayden Homes #5
Best of Show – Woodhill Homes #8
Best Value – Woodhill Homes #8

$675,000 – $700,000
Best Architectural Design – Curtis Homes #20
Best Feature – ‘Dog Wash’ – Curtis Homes #20
Best Interior Finish – Curtis Homes #20
Best Kitchen – Curtis Homes #20
Best Landscaping – Curtis Homes #20
Best Master Suite – Curtis Homes #20
Best of Show – Curtis Homes #20
Best Value – Curtis Homes #20

$775,000 – $800,000
Best Architectural Design – Winsome Construction #26
Best Feature – ‘Mudroom’ – Stone Bridge Homes NW #24
Best Interior Finish – NW #22 Structure Development
Best NW #22 Kitchen Structure Development
Best Landscaping – NW #22 Structure Development
Best Master Suite – Stone Bridge Homes NW #24
Best of Show – NW Structure Development #22
Best Value – NW #22 Structure Development

$825,000 – $850,000
Best Architectural Design – Stone Bridge Homes NW #14
Best Feature – ‘Mechanical Room’ – Palmer Homes #10
Best Interior Finish – Palmer Homes #10
Best Kitchen – Stone Bridge Homes NW #14
Best Landscaping – Luis Rosas Construction #4
Best Master Suite – Luis Rosas Construction #4
Best of Show – Palmer Homes #10
Best Value – Construction Luis Rosas #4

$875,000 – $975,000
Best Architectural Design – JD Neel Construction #9
Best Feature – ‘Basement/ADU’ – JD Neel Construction #9
Best Interior Finish – JD Neel Construction #9
Best Kitchen – JD Neel Construction #9
Best Landscaping – JD Neel Construction #9
Best Master Suite – JD Neel Construction #9
Best of Show – JD Neel Construction #9
Best Value – JD Neel Construction #9

$1,050,000-$1,100,000
Best Architectural Design – Black Label Design Group #25
Best Feature – ‘Outdoor Fireplace’ – Pahlisch Homes #15
Best Interior Finish – Pahlisch Homes #15
Best Kitchen – Black Label Design Group #25
Best Landscaping – Pahlisch Homes #15
Best Master Suite – Pahlisch Homes #15
Best of Show – Pahlisch Houses #15
Best Value – Pahlisch Homes #15

$1,250,000 – $1,400,000
Best Architectural Design – Momentasize Construction #16
Best Feature – ‘Tesla Solar Roof’ – Momentasize Construction #16
Best Interior Finish – Solar Home Builders #3
Best Kitchen – Solar Home Builders #3
Best Landscaping – Momentasize Construction #16
Best Master Suite – Solaire Home Builders #3
Best of Show – Solaire Home Builders #3
Best Value – Solar Home Builders #3

$1,500,000 – $1,600,000
Best Architectural Design – Malace Homes #17
Best Feature – “Best Entertainment Space” – Malace Homes #17
Best Interior Finish – Malace Homes #17
Best Kitchen – Malace Homes #17
Best Landscaping – Malace Homes #17
Best Master Suite – Malace Homes #17
Best of Show – Malace Homes #17
Best Value – Malace Homes #17

$1,900,000 – $2,350,000
Best Architectural Design – CNC Homes #27
Best Feature – ‘Staircase’ – CNC Houses #27
Best Interior Finish – CNC Homes #27
Best Kitchen – Axis Enterprises #13
Best Landscaping – CNC Homes #27
Best Master Suite – CNC Homes #27
Best of Show – CNC Homes #27
Best Value – Axis Enterprises #13

$2,700,000-$2,900,000
Best Architectural Design – Norman Building & Design #12
Best Feature – ‘Back Deck/Infinity Pool’ – Norman Building & Design #12
Best Interior Finish – Baxter Builders #11
Best Kitchen – Baxter Builders #11
Best Landscaping – Baxter Builders #11
Best Master Suite – Norman Building & Design #12
Best of Show – Baxter Builders #11
Best Value – Baxter Builders #11

]]>
This couple is restoring the Candyland house in Rogers Park – and you can follow on Instagram https://myrumah.net/this-couple-is-restoring-the-candyland-house-in-rogers-park-and-you-can-follow-on-instagram/ Mon, 18 Jul 2022 12:25:00 +0000 https://myrumah.net/this-couple-is-restoring-the-candyland-house-in-rogers-park-and-you-can-follow-on-instagram/ ROGERS PARK – Candyland House has new owners who are restoring and putting their own spin on the monument in Rogers Park. Engaged couple Joe Bergantino and Ricky Gonzalez bought the pastel-colored Victorian home at 1525 W. Pratt Blvd. This year. They renovate the house and document it on Instagram. The Candyland House was the […]]]>

ROGERS PARK – Candyland House has new owners who are restoring and putting their own spin on the monument in Rogers Park.

Engaged couple Joe Bergantino and Ricky Gonzalez bought the pastel-colored Victorian home at 1525 W. Pratt Blvd. This year. They renovate the house and document it on Instagram.

The Candyland House was the longtime home of local artists Jackie Seiden and the late Don Seiden. The couple decorated virtually every part of the house in pastel shades, even infusing some interiors with glitter-speckled paint.

The Seiden family put the house up for sale last year, causing some to worry if future owners would keep the vibrant and eclectic color scheme.

Those concerns can be dismissed, Bergantino and Gonzalez said. Although part of the house needs updating, much of the color scheme and frills will remain or be improved.

“We want to keep the funkiness and just update it,” Bergantino said. “This house deserves it.”

Credit: Zillow
The Candyland House hit the market in 2021.

Bergantino and Gonzalez moved into the house during the winter and began to discover the extent of the house’s eccentricities. Renovations to the house started this spring and summer.

Some of the colorful features of the house need replacing, including the interior flooring and the candy-colored wooden walkway that connects the house to the shed. Devices need to be replaced and new ones won’t be pastel, they said. The wooden walkway is replaced by cobblestones.

The couple will keep the exterior colors except for teal.

“It’s not really in the color wheel,” Gonzalez said.

Other improvements will be very well preserved in the spirit of the house.

The couple plans to add stained glass to parts of the house. New paint schemes will always be bold and even include glitter. Gonzalez said he decided to paint his new office pink.

“We’re a lot more adventurous than we otherwise would be,” Gonzalez said. “It gives us a lot of freedom to be creative.”

Credit: Courtesy of Joe Bergantino
Joe Bergantino is sanding the walls of his new office.

Bergantino and Gonzalez previously owned a single-family home in Rogers Park. During the pandemic, the couple found this home too small and looked for a bigger place to accommodate the work-from-home lifestyle.

They missed out on some of their top picks during the housing market boom. After a few hiccups, their real estate agent showed them the Candyland House listing.

The couple knew the house, having passed it five or six years ago and noticing it. Bergantino has always been a fan of the house, while Gonzalez has not been sold. But when they toured the house, they noticed its spacious rooms, double-width lot, huge open-concept third floor, and shed.

“The funkiness was what really appealed to me,” Bergantino said. “Once we saw the third floor and the shed, I said, ‘Yeah. It’s logic.'”

They plan to erect walls around what is now an open concept bathroom on the third floor, they said.

Credit: Zillow
In the Candyland House, everything is pastel-coloured, including the blinds and the radiator.
Credit: Zillow
An upstairs loft has been converted into an art studio, with an open concept bathroom.

Don Seiden was an artist, arts educator, and art therapy pioneer who founded the Department of Art Therapy at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. A renowned sculptor, he was also director of the institute’s sculpture department. He died in 2019, two days after his 92nd birthday.

Jackie Seiden is an artist and art teacher who taught classes at her home in Rogers Park. Jackie was the creative force behind the Candyland House, using the house as a blank canvas.

When Jackie Seiden moved in, the house was painted a “dull olive green,” she told DNAinfo Chicago in 2013. That coat of paint had to come off. She said the inspiration for the colors came from sneaking into the now defunct, art deco-inspired Edgewater Beach Hotel with her friends in her youth.

“The interior became these pastel colors, and I took them outside,” she said.

Credit: Zillow
The candy-colored walkway connecting the car and the main houses had to be removed due to rotting wood.

The five-bedroom house was built in 1891. It was rated “orange” in the city’s historical survey, giving it some protections from demolition or redevelopment.

Along with decor updates, the house has been remodeled to feature skylights and make room for practicing art.

The house’s garage, painted pastel orange, has been transformed into an art studio with a loft on the second floor. The third floor, with skylights, served as a space for artistic teaching.

Bergantino and Gonzalez’s first offer on the house was rejected. Afterwards, the couple wrote a letter to Jackie Seiden, saying how inspired they were by the house and how they planned to honor its design and decor.

The letter seems to have done the trick, they said.

“The house is ridiculous in the best possible way,” Gonzalez said. “Everything we learned about Don and Jackie has been very inspiring. They are our inspiration to be more creative and adventurous.

To follow the renovation of Bergantino and Gonzalez’s house, click here.

Credit: Zillow
Every part of the Candyland House is brightly colored, including the deck table and the shutters.
Credit: Zillow
Virtually every aspect of Candyland House sticks to the pastel theme.

Subscribe to Block Club Chicago, an independent, 501(c)(3), journalist-run newsroom. Every penny we earn funds neighborhoods across Chicago.

Click here to support Block Club with a tax-deductible donation.

Thank you for subscribing to Block Club Chicago, an independent, 501(c)(3), journalist-run newsroom. Every penny we make funds Chicago neighborhoods. Click here to support Block Club with a tax-deductible donation.

Listen to “It’s Alright: A Block Club Chicago Podcast”:

]]>
ACNH’s rotten tree and other items villagers won’t keep in their homes https://myrumah.net/acnhs-rotten-tree-and-other-items-villagers-wont-keep-in-their-homes/ Sat, 16 Jul 2022 13:30:00 +0000 https://myrumah.net/acnhs-rotten-tree-and-other-items-villagers-wont-keep-in-their-homes/ Animal Crossing: New Horizons players have noticed that some items, like the decayed tree to craft, never seem to appear in villager houses. Animal Crossing: New Horizons players have noticed that some items, like the craftable Rotten Tree, never seem to spawn in villager homes. Villagers usually use the items they get as gifts: they […]]]>

Animal Crossing: New Horizons players have noticed that some items, like the decayed tree to craft, never seem to appear in villager houses.

Animal Crossing: New Horizons players have noticed that some items, like the craftable Rotten Tree, never seem to spawn in villager homes. Villagers usually use the items they get as gifts: they put on clothes that the player hands them and display furniture that players send in the mail. It may disappoint a particularly customization-oriented island representative to gift a villager an item that they think matches their house aesthetic well, expecting to see it in their house the next day, for find that it never appears. But they shouldn’t be too surprised, because there are patterns in the exceptions the villagers make.

VIDEO OF THE DAY

There have always been limits to influencing a animal crossing villager house design. It was impossible in the series to get an animal neighbor to change their carpet or wallpaper from the original GameCube animal crossing – much to the chagrin of ACNH players who dislike the simple house interiors that the first three villagers on an island receive. They never left items without suitable furniture models, such as stationery packs, in their homes.

Related: Animal Crossing Characters With Folk Backgrounds

What causes them to discriminate against furniture like the Rotten Tree, however, is size. Villagers often move to islands with large furniture in their homes – but are unlikely to use the same decor if they get it from players. Whereas New Horizons allows free movement on its map, the placement of objects and other objects in the game is based on tiles. A villager is reasonably likely to display an item that takes up one or two tiles of space, especially if it is small enough to place on a table. But decorations like the Rotten Tree take up four tiles each, and other furniture can take up nine tiles. Space preferences based on the number of tiles may also explain why villagers never place rugs in their homes, even though a decorator’s ability to place furniture on them means they are easy to install almost never. anywhere in a room.


Animal Crossing: New Horizons NPCs don’t change the above ground setting


Animal Crossing New Horizons Gyroids on Furniture

As with large items, villagers rarely use wall or ceiling decorations that do not come with the default versions of their houses. Decorations like lamps hanging from the ceiling and lanterns came into being with Animal Crossing: New HorizonsLast fall’s 2.0 update, which perhaps just didn’t add the ability for villagers to account for their caps. During this time, villagers may avoid using wall decorations due to the AI’s potential difficulty in finding ideal locations for these items. Different types of wallpaper feature different styles, sizes and locations of features such as windows and decorative mouldings, which means it’s easy for a wall feature that seems naturally placed in a home to look out of place in the same place. another one.


It might seem a shame that there’s no way an island resident could turn Lucky the mummified dog’s home into a spooky forest of rotting trees, or get Wolfgang the wolf to display an entire skeleton. of triceratops as he did in the original. animal crossing. But even in a highly customizable game like Animal Crossing: New Horizonsit’s fair to draw a few lines and allow villagers to retain some control over their spaces.

Next: Animal Crossing Villagers Who Don’t Deserve Hate

The next Spider-Man game might use a new villain.

Spider-Man Villains That Never Appeared In Video Games


About the Author

]]>
hospitality + creativity unite within the dynamic POSThome in milan https://myrumah.net/hospitality-creativity-unite-within-the-dynamic-posthome-in-milan/ Thu, 14 Jul 2022 20:34:00 +0000 https://myrumah.net/hospitality-creativity-unite-within-the-dynamic-posthome-in-milan/ smart living meets creative hospitality at POSThome, milan The POSThome project in Milan, Italy, was designed during the first lockdown as a smart apartment in which security, comfort and technology come together to meet the needs of the “new normal”. Located in a 1930s building in the heart of the Italian metropolis, the 2022 iteration […]]]>

smart living meets creative hospitality at POSThome, milan

The POSThome project in Milan, Italy, was designed during the first lockdown as a smart apartment in which security, comfort and technology come together to meet the needs of the “new normal”. Located in a 1930s building in the heart of the Italian metropolis, the 2022 iteration of this residential concept reflects the evolution of hospitality and travel. The colorful interior was designed by the Milanese studio ThirtyOne to become a creative refuge full of vibrant colors, varied textures and natural materials. This year, the team also created ‘Light as Clouds’, a light installation suspended on the balcony of the apartment. The work is done 100% recyclable materials and was created with sustainability in mind.

To learn more about POSThome’s multifunctional environment, as well as the ‘Light as Clouds’ installation, designboom spoke with Claudia Campone, founder of ThirtyOne Design studio. See the interview in full below.

all images courtesy of Valentina Sommariva

interview with Claudia Campone

designboom (DB): POSThome was born as an after-house, just after the first confinement in 2020. How has POSThome evolved since then, and what thoughts have been generated over time?

Claudia Campone (CC): As the confinement experience evolved in many ways, we also felt the need for POSThome to follow this evolution as any design project should. In fact, I believe that every project, in any field or scale, should live its own life. Imagine how often we renovate our homes or how often a restaurant needs to renovate its tables and chairs – these are positive signs of an optimistic approach to life.

POSThome began as theoretical research which then materialized: a life-size model of a “storm shelter” taking place outside these walls. It then became a space for online social interactions, work meetings, networking activities and, more generally, creation. That’s why we thought the natural evolution of this space was the art residency – a space where, at different times of the year, can accommodate an artist or creative professional who can work from there and leave a trace of his presence. .

hospitality + creativity come together in the vibrant and smart interior of POSThome in milan

DB: How would you describe your work to someone who has never seen your projects before?

CC : Creativity and design are often misunderstood with decoration or make-up work: in fact, in my work, I have always tried to be creative by solving problems or finding unexpected solutions to obvious problems. This is also the reason why my company is called Thirtyone Design. In Italian, we use this common saying: “Once you’ve done thirty, do thirty-one”, which always means trying to go the extra mile, push further and challenge the first solution to get a better result.

From my training in Design to my first professional experience in the field of luxury distribution, I have always tried to maintain a transversal approach between the visual arts, theoretical research and a playful approach. I believe that some of my major projects perfectly embody this diversity. Consider the site-specific installation Biggest Bow, which every year helped people lift their heads in a real and metaphorical approach to life.

hospitality + creativity come together in the vibrant and smart interior of POSThome in milan

DB: Sustainability is a central theme of the project presented at Milan Design Week, Light as Clouds. Can you say more about the concept behind the project?

CC : This concept was born at a specific time in the office, when we were planning to imagine a strong message for Design Week. There has been great expectation around this great event in Milan, after the pandemic period, and being the 60th edition of the Salone del Mobile. But our feeling was that the real urgency of the Design community was no longer to present new (are they really new?) furniture/products, but that Designers should be the ones looking ahead for everyone , waving hand over a vision of the future. This is why, on the contrary, we thought about the good side of the “vacuum” and the calm of the past 2 years, in particular on the reduction of our footprint on this planet: less travel, less consumption, less production of waste. Every big event, on the contrary, has a big impact on.

With my team, we wanted to accentuate this notion of imprint and make it as visible as possible. We researched the (unbelievable!) average amount of packaging waste produced by a single family each week, and provocatively chose the light cloud shape to communicate that heavy footprint. Our partners for this project are 2 brands (Linificio and KUKU) who are doing an incredible job in sustainable packaging related to food consumption. Thanks to them, LIGHT AS CLOUDS was launched a few days before Milan Design Week as a warning message to the city and the neighborhood around us.

hospitality + creativity come together in the vibrant and smart interior of POSThome in milan

DB: Is sustainability something that you and your studio usually focus on?

CC : Yes, as every citizen of this planet should believe. We all understand that choosing to go sustainable means additional costs and time. But luckily the world is changing and everyone is trying to do the best they can. For this reason, working as a designer for sustainability, choosing materials and finishing, becomes easier every time by not only identifying productions with a 100% recycling process, but also by working with small companies that are “socially and economically” sustainable in a broader approach. on this subject. POSThome has been our Manifesto project in this sense: not only have we identified ourselves as pioneers in the production of 100% organic-based materials, but we are also carrying out research in the identification of small businesses and small craftsmen instead of choosing the fast lane of mainstream or “seen”. on-the.IG” elements. We are currently working for Lanerossi, creating their first Flagship in Milan which is scheduled to open next fall season. It is an amazing brand with a great heritage but nonetheless they continue to innovate to improve the sustainable production process.

hospitality + creativity come together in the vibrant and smart interior of POSThome in milan

DB: One of the main elements that make POSThome unique are its artist residencies. What is your vision of the links between art and design?

CC: As I mentioned earlier, POSThome has naturally become this place where creative things happen and where interesting people meet, simply because all our homes, our living spaces, are in fact this kind of places. Particularly in the Mediterranean culture, we like having people (lots of people!) at home with us, sharing food and ideas, talking about everything and creating a personal/collective space that changes every time with the guests. This is why we have opened our doors to artists and we constantly like to keep direct contact with the artistic institutions and academies of our cities (Rome and Milan). Artists as Designers have a talent for visioning: anticipating what is about to happen, imagining next steps, and beginning to chart possible paths.

hospitality + creativity come together in the vibrant and smart interior of POSThome in milan

DB: From interior projects to installations to design, is there a specific medium that you most enjoy working with?

CC: I’m a draftsman, almost a graphomaniac. Since I was little I could spend hours without fatigue drawing, painting, watercolor. I remember once when I visited a tailor’s shop in London, this old man was explaining to me how muscle memory, after many years of repeating the same gesture, had become the most powerful tool among his hands. I believe that our job as designers is exactly the same: we have a powerful magical connection between our brain and our hand holding a pencil, and as long as we constantly train this “muscle memory”, this link between imagining and making, we can create our own magic wand. Of course in my firm we use any digital resource and software but often, if only from a 3D model or a CAD plan, I feel more the limitation of these devices than the opportunities.

hospitality + creativity come together in the vibrant and smart interior of POSThome in milan

DB: What are you working on at the moment?

CC: We are having an incredibly successful year and I am very grateful for that. Our main projects still concern Retail Luxury Fashion and Luxury Goods, but as we observe a general trend towards the merger between F&B, Retail and Residential, we are now delivering projects that become true Lifestyle and Experience Design concepts. It all started when Dior requested a collaboration to design their open-air boutique in Capri completely immersed in a natural rock cave and featuring custom pieces in traditional local materials. In every project, we try to inform the design process with meaningful storytelling: recently, with Technogym, we conducted a store activation process to celebrate not only their innovative products, but also their talent and unique network of champions .

When we establish a collaborative design process with our client, it quickly becomes an opportunity to challenge ourselves to explore new topics and push the boundaries of our design research: it has been a very rewarding experience with Uniqlo, a brand that invests a lot of energy in design development. phasing of a very open approach in creative methodology.

A very exciting collaboration is now starting with the Langosteria Group and this will be our first F&B challenge: by tackling this area, we are achieving the next level of complexity in terms of function and aesthetic integration: so stay tuned because good things are coming!

hospitality + creativity come together in the vibrant and smart interior of POSThome in milan

]]>
Your Friendly Neighborhood Architect | MIT News https://myrumah.net/your-friendly-neighborhood-architect-mit-news/ Wed, 13 Jul 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://myrumah.net/your-friendly-neighborhood-architect-mit-news/ Justin Brazier didn’t always know his path in life would lead him home. Brazier grew up with two brothers in a close-knit family in Randolph, Massachusetts, two towns south of Boston. Her parents, who are Haitian immigrants, had also grown up in the Boston area and met there. From an early age, Brazier liked to […]]]>

Justin Brazier didn’t always know his path in life would lead him home.

Brazier grew up with two brothers in a close-knit family in Randolph, Massachusetts, two towns south of Boston. Her parents, who are Haitian immigrants, had also grown up in the Boston area and met there.

From an early age, Brazier liked to draw. But when it came time to go to college, he didn’t think he could find viable work as an artist. Instead, he sought out other exciting careers, jumping from college to college in the Boston area and across many disciplines, from engineering to business to chemistry. But he had no luck finding a match.

Eventually, after years of searching, “I bit the bullet to pursue art,” thinking that even “if I don’t make money, at least I’ll be happy,” he says. Brazier returned to Boston to study at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design. At first, he turned to industrial design with the aim of designing sneakers. But then some of his teachers encouraged him to turn to architecture, where he could develop a broader skill set. “I took classes and everything clicked,” he says.

Brazier’s interest in architecture solidified during his undergraduate studies when he joined the Farmers Collaborative, a Boston-based group that works with city officials to turn vacant land into urban agricultural centers. . Brazier began by designing garden beds for the collaboration’s projects, working with co-founders CJ Valerus and Leon David. These grow beds have become a food source in the Boston community and have helped alleviate food insecurity. Through this work and his studies, “I realized the ability of architects to shape the environment. The design of greenhouses and agricultural structures can connect people to their history and culture,” he says.

After graduating, Brazier continued to work with the Farmers Collaborative, while maintaining a full-time job. With only a bachelor’s degree in architecture, however, he was limited in how far he could move projects forward. To fully complete a project on his own, he would need a professional license. Because of this, “I always knew I wanted to go to graduate school to become a full-fledged architect,” says Brazier. After taking a few years off from school to work, he joined MIT’s MArch program.

Brazier plans to use his expertise as a licensed architect to help communities, especially those of color, transform neighborhoods through urban agriculture and food sovereignty. This goal, rooted in his childhood and family background, is “really important to me,” he says.

A new community greenhouse in progress

While pursuing his master’s degree, Brazier remained involved with the Farmers Collaborative. He is currently working on a project with Velarus and David to build a year-round greenhouse in Mattapan, a Boston neighborhood with a large Haitian population, where his father grew up. Brazier also enlisted professor and licensed architect Sheila Kennedy, his mentor at MIT, to help with the project.

One of the main objectives of the greenhouse project is to improve food security in Mattapan through urban agriculture. Brazier takes a holistic approach to the project, informed by neighborhood input. “We think of the agricultural process in a complete cycle, where we have pollination, food growth and composting,” he says. In addition to the main greenhouse, the community space will include a bee apiary, several outdoor flower beds and a composting area.

The space will also serve as a gathering place for the community. People can relax in the patio seating area or host an outdoor farmer’s market out back. Brazier also hopes to introduce educational programs in space to teach children about agriculture and the climate. “We want to create a space that contributes to the overall sustainability of the neighborhood, culturally and socially,” explains Brazier.

The greenhouse will be located on a corner lot off busy Morton Street. The lot is a five minute walk from the main street intersection with Blue Hill Avenue. “It’s an important area that can really show what the community is capable of,” says Brazier.

Prior to the Morton Street project, Brazier worked on a similar project with the collaboration to build a greenhouse in Dorchester, a neighborhood adjacent to Mattapan that is also home to a large black community. The previous project, coordinated by architect Wyly Brown and graduate students from MassArt, called HERO Hope Garden, is located on Geneva Avenue in the heart of Dorchester. In the center of the garden is a wooden greenhouse with a pitched slatted roof, flanked by several grow beds and an open patio with a painted wall backdrop. “Everyone loves it,” Brazier says. “It has helped the community grow food to avoid food insecurities, especially during Covid.”

Brazier and the collaboration are using the HERO Hope Garden as a model for the Morton Street project, continuing its successes and making strategic improvements. For example, although the wooden greenhouse in the garden is completely closed, the animals and the cold winter air still find their way inside. For the Morton Street project, “it will be a steel construction, which is much more robust,” he says. “And it’s going to be completely waterproof to operate in all seasons” for increased food production.

To make this community project possible, the City of Boston provides funding through the Mayor’s Office of Housing and the Community Preservation Act. But “to complete the project in its entirety,” there is still “a small funding gap,” Brazier says. He and the collaboration are currently seeking additional funding to fill this gap and ensure the community can have all of the project’s intended functionality.

In the meantime, with most of the funding secured, construction of the Morton Street project will begin this summer and is expected to be completed next summer.

Empowering communities to bring their ideas to life

Although Brazier has been heavily involved in urban agriculture projects in recent years, he ultimately sees himself playing a larger role in the community. He has noticed that when people, especially those of color, come up with ideas to improve their neighborhoods, they often struggle to move their ideas forward. “People want to bring different things to the city but don’t have the skills or the language” and need the help of an architect, he says. But to many people of color, an architect “feels like someone they can’t really approach” because they don’t know or relate to anyone.

This is where Brazier comes in. Its roots in the Greater Boston area make it more accessible to people from those communities. Brazier has received calls to help develop proposals for the Mattapan area and beyond, including turning a derelict building into a café, setting up art installations in the alleys and carrying out studies of design for new developers looking to create local ownership in their neighborhoods. His plans and renderings have helped people start conversations with city officials about their ideas, opening doors even if the plans don’t come to fruition.

Last year, some people Brazier grew up with approached him to help renovate their sneaker store in Randolph. Brazier worked on the interior design of the store, named Kerms. Located near Randolph High School, Kerms is now setting an inspiring example for children in the community, showing them that “they can stay in Randolph and become homeowners,” he says.

Brazier is happy to be in a place where people feel comfortable asking him for any design help he can provide. Ultimately, all he wants to do is “empower people to develop their own environment and leave their mark on their own neighborhood,” he says.

]]>
High Point Market plays a prominent role in streaming TV series https://myrumah.net/high-point-market-plays-a-prominent-role-in-streaming-tv-series/ Mon, 11 Jul 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://myrumah.net/high-point-market-plays-a-prominent-role-in-streaming-tv-series/ In its second season, the EarthxTV streaming series Chez Laurence makes a powerful argument for sustainable interior design. Tweet that For the second season premiere episode, Carr was filmed on location at last year’s Fall Market where she participated in an immersive activation called “Sustainability Stories at Center Stage”, hosted by the High Point Market […]]]>

For the second season premiere episode, Carr was filmed on location at last year’s Fall Market where she participated in an immersive activation called “Sustainability Stories at Center Stage”, hosted by the High Point Market Authority (HPMA). Drawing on its expertise in circularity as New YorkNew York-based interior designer Carr staged one of three vignettes featuring sustainable furniture innovations from Currey & Company and Phillips Collection, as well as paint from Farrow & Ball and materials like Repreve, which is made from 100% ocean-bound recycled plastic.

Current High Point Market exhibitors featured or appearing in this broadcast of “Create things that last” to understand Aloka HomeCisco Home, Copeland, Crypton, etúHOME, Libeco, Moore & Giles, Rowe Furniture and the industry association Sustainable Furnishings Council (SFC).

by Laurence Carr The EarthxTV series makes a powerful argument for sustainable interior design and shows how product selection can contribute to positive change,” says Ashley Grigg, Marketing and Communication Director HPMA. “We are delighted to have High Point Market and many of our leading exhibitors in sustainable furnishings being recognized at the show.”

“I was thrilled to include High Point Market in At Laurence’s“, says Carr. “It is a reliable and valuable resource for interior designers looking for sustainable products, new materials, inspiration and education.

The role of High Point Market, its exhibitors and founding member of the SFC Susan Inglis continues in future episodes, scheduled for release on EarthxTV every Saturday at 12:30 p.m. (ET) then available on demand, throughout the new season.

EarthxTV is a free 24/7 television network, video on demand, mobile app and streaming platform. Promoting the environment and sustainability, EarthxTV offers over 300 hours of original programming, discussions with world leaders, world events and award-winning films that are entertaining and informative.

[HI RES IMAGE LINK]

SOURCE High Point Market Authority

]]>