Interior Architecture – My Rumah http://myrumah.net/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 04:41:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://myrumah.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Interior Architecture – My Rumah http://myrumah.net/ 32 32 Interior Designer – Los Angeles, CA, USA | Works https://myrumah.net/interior-designer-los-angeles-ca-usa-works/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 04:41:47 +0000 https://myrumah.net/interior-designer-los-angeles-ca-usa-works/ Alloi Architecture + Construction is a growing, award-winning design-build firm comprised of architects, builders and support staff. Our work ranges from modern kitchen renovations to large scale institutional projects, with most of our practices focused on the detailed design and construction of high performance custom minimalist modern homes. We are looking for an interior designer […]]]>

Alloi Architecture + Construction is a growing, award-winning design-build firm comprised of architects, builders and support staff. Our work ranges from modern kitchen renovations to large scale institutional projects, with most of our practices focused on the detailed design and construction of high performance custom minimalist modern homes.

We are looking for an interior designer with 5+ years of experience to manage the interior architecture and design of various unique projects in Los Angeles.

We value craftsmanship and creativity in architecture and construction and are expanding our team of focused professionals.

See our work at www.alloi.us

Responsibilities

  • Understand the interior design selection process
  • Select and manage materials and accessories
  • Work closely with the design and construction team
  • Create digital and physical moodboards
  • Present design packages to clients and associates
  • Interact and manage architectural office procedures
  • Sketch conceptual layouts by hand
  • Model your projects digitally
  • Understand the building and planning codes of Los Angeles, Santa Monica and Culver City
  • Understand cost management
  • Be humble and teachable

Skills and experience required

  • Minimum of 5 years of experience in interior design and construction for single-family residential projects
  • Degree in interior design / interior architecture required.
  • Strong organizational skills
  • Strong procurement knowledge for materials and FF&E required.
  • Management skills
  • Effective interpersonal skills
  • team player
  • Work in cooperation
  • Ability to multi-task
  • Excellence in Revit MANDATORY.
  • Ideal Bluebeam Skill
  • Fohlio ideal skill
  • Ideal Lumion Skill
  • Strong interest and proficiency in lighting design an asset.
  • Work efficiently and meet deadlines
  • Ability to coordinate with multiple disciplines

Salary

  • Commensurate with level of education, work experience and demonstrated knowledge base.
  • Full benefits package included.
  • Equal Opportunity Employer.

Email the following documents to apply and make sure to add your name to the subject line of the email

  • Cover letter
  • resume
  • Wallet
  • Emails and phone numbers of three references (U.S. phone numbers only
  • Applicants will need to arrange calls between references and the Alloi hiring manager

Our interview process:

  • Stage 1 selection interview: 20-minute zoom
  • Detailed interview of stage 2: zoom of 60 minutes
  • Stage 3 referral interviews: 10 minute call per referral



View your application history



Back to task list…

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A non-tenured professor asks the School of the Art Institute to recognize the union https://myrumah.net/a-non-tenured-professor-asks-the-school-of-the-art-institute-to-recognize-the-union/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 00:23:00 +0000 https://myrumah.net/a-non-tenured-professor-asks-the-school-of-the-art-institute-to-recognize-the-union/ Non-tenured faculty at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago have asked the school’s administration to voluntarily recognize their union. A “strong majority” of the faculty’s bargaining unit, which includes some 600 adjunct professors and lecturers at the school, have signed union permission cards, members of the school’s organizing committee said on Wednesday. faculty […]]]>

Non-tenured faculty at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago have asked the school’s administration to voluntarily recognize their union.

A “strong majority” of the faculty’s bargaining unit, which includes some 600 adjunct professors and lecturers at the school, have signed union permission cards, members of the school’s organizing committee said on Wednesday. faculty in a letter to school president Elissa Tenny.

The school’s adjunct teachers and lecturers gathered outside the museum late Wednesday afternoon, calling for job security, higher salaries and health insurance for lecturers, who teach without it.

“We’re adding our hard work and strong voices to a whole movement that’s growing across this country,” said Elena Ailes, an assistant assistant professor at the school who teaches sculpture and first-grade fundamentals.

“We elevate the notion that teaching is work, cultural work is work, arts educators and cultural workers are workers, and our work has value,” Ailes said.

“There are so many of us that if we took a day off, this school wouldn’t work,” said Anjulie Rao, a lecturer who teaches in the department of architecture, interior design and design objects and design. arts journalism. “And yet they treat us like the most disposable employees they have. We are teachers’ construction workers.

Art Institute staffers formed the city’s first major museum union when they voted to unionize 142-44 in January. Museum school staff quickly followed with a vote of 115 to 48 for the union. If non-permanent faculty succeed in unionizing, they would form a separate third bargaining unit under the union umbrella.

If the school does not voluntarily recognize the union, the faculty will file an election application with the National Labor Relations Board. Workers would then need a simple majority vote to unionise.

In a statement, SAIC communications director Bree Witt said unionization was a decision the faculty would make “individually and collectively.”

“If a union is elected, we look forward to working with the bargaining team,” Witt said.

Aldus. Susan Sadlowski Garza, 10th, spoke out in support of the faculty union on Wednesday, as did state Rep. Delia Ramirez, who is running for Congress.

“We know this school has a world-class reputation, and that’s thanks to all of you here,” Ramirez said. “But the administration doesn’t recognize everything you do.”

SAIC non-tenured faculty first announced their intention to unionize in May. Nearly 200 deputies and teachers at the school signed an open letter announcing the union campaign, calling their working conditions “intolerable”. The school’s two-tier pay and benefits system creates a “permanent underclass of contingent faculty,” they wrote.

In May, school president Tenny and provost Martin Berger said in an email to the part-time faculty that they “did not believe unionization was in the best interest of the faculty or the school”, but that they would negotiate with a union if one of them were elected. .

If the untenured faculty succeeds in forming a union, it will more than double the size of the Art Institute of Chicago Workers United, which currently represents about 500 workers. Union members include curators, retail workers, librarians and museum guards as well as educational advisers, administrative assistants and mailroom workers at the school.

Workers would be represented by the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, which represents unionized museum and school workers as well as other utility workers nationwide, including at the public library. from Chicago. In recent years, museum workers, including the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, have also unionized with AFSCME.

After gathering on the steps of the Art Institute on Wednesday, faculty members and supporters marched to the Sharp Building, a building on campus where they say President Tenny was hosting a school event.

“What is outrageous? Poverty wages,” they chanted outside the building.

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Play Architecture towers over a resort restaurant in India with an undulating tiled roof https://myrumah.net/play-architecture-towers-over-a-resort-restaurant-in-india-with-an-undulating-tiled-roof/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://myrumah.net/play-architecture-towers-over-a-resort-restaurant-in-india-with-an-undulating-tiled-roof/ A corrugated tiled roof formed by intersecting catenary vaults houses this lakeside restaurant, designed by Bangalore-based Play Architecture for the Deva Dhare Resort in Karnataka, India. Perched above a narrow creek on recycled steel pilings, the structure, which was shortlisted in the 2022 Dezeen Awards Hospitality Building category, provides internal and external dining areas for […]]]>

A corrugated tiled roof formed by intersecting catenary vaults houses this lakeside restaurant, designed by Bangalore-based Play Architecture for the Deva Dhare Resort in Karnataka, India.

Perched above a narrow creek on recycled steel pilings, the structure, which was shortlisted in the 2022 Dezeen Awards Hospitality Building category, provides internal and external dining areas for the 10-acre resort. .

The Deva Dhare restaurant is topped with a vaulted tiled roof

Nestled in the forests of Sakleshpur with sweeping views of the Western Ghats mountain range, Play Architecture sought to create a form that would “weave and blend seamlessly” into the landscape, using materials and hand -local work.

“The dining room is located on an extremely ecologically sensitive area, where you have to touch the ground gently,” the studio explained.

“The design approach is bottom-up, where the construction process and choice of materials takes into account the local climate, soil conditions, flora and available local labor.”

Raised restaurant in India topped with a tiled vault by Play Architecture
The restaurant sits above a small stream in a forest in Sakleshpur

To create a column-free interior, a dramatic, unreinforced catenary vaulted roof spanning 16 meters was created, using five layers of 15 millimeter clay tiles typical of the region.

This roof rests on a granite and steel deck slab, supported by the structure of slender steel columns painted green below and accessed by two stone staircases on either side.

“The shape shows how forces flow through the structure, and the strength of the shape allows large spans to be constructed with small thicknesses, saving on materials and labor,” the studio said.

“Furthermore, the objective of this research was to stay away from sophisticated software solutions and find geometric and logical means and practical methods, allowing unskilled labor to apply the idea daily.”

Restaurant seating under a vaulted ceiling with large glass openings
Four glazed openings under the corrugated roof provide views of the surroundings

Four arched openings on either side of the restaurant are filled with full-height glazing framed in black steel, offering views in all directions.

To the east and west, glass doors give access to two terraces overlooking the lake and stream, and to the north, a small hallway leads to a separate toilet block.

Below restaurant tile vaulted ceiling by Play Architecture with glass door leading to terrace
The curved roof is formed by intersecting catenary vaults

The platform’s granite slabs were left exposed throughout, creating continuity between the interior and exterior, and some were replaced with glass to provide views of the creek below.

“The project is a simple and straightforward demonstration of the strength of an idea…with a sincere effort to faithfully express the tectonics of materials and construction,” the practice said.

Other shortlisted projects in the hospitality building category of the 2022 Dezeen Awards include a copper-clad shelter for a teahouse in China by Neri & Hu Design and Research Office, and a boutique hotel in Mexico by Alberto Kalach. surmounted by barrel-vaulted roofs.

The photograph is by Bharat Ramamrutham.

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Ten beautiful brutalist interiors with a surprisingly welcoming feel https://myrumah.net/ten-beautiful-brutalist-interiors-with-a-surprisingly-welcoming-feel/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://myrumah.net/ten-beautiful-brutalist-interiors-with-a-surprisingly-welcoming-feel/ For our latest lookbook, we’ve rounded up 10 brutalist interiors from the UK to Brazil and Indonesia that show how textiles, plants and colors can be used to soften monolithic concrete spaces and create a warm atmosphere. Brutalism as an architectural style often uses concrete to create large, sculptural buildings. These interiors in brutalist buildings […]]]>

For our latest lookbook, we’ve rounded up 10 brutalist interiors from the UK to Brazil and Indonesia that show how textiles, plants and colors can be used to soften monolithic concrete spaces and create a warm atmosphere.

Brutalism as an architectural style often uses concrete to create large, sculptural buildings. These interiors in brutalist buildings feature plenty of concrete and harsh angles, but still manage to feel both warm and welcoming.

Colorful tiles, wooden details and tactile textiles and an abundance of green plants have been used to create welcoming living rooms, bathrooms and even workspaces in these brutalist buildings, which include the Barbican in London and the Riverside Tower in Antwerp.

This is the latest in our lookbook series, which is visually inspired by the Dezeen archives. For more inspiration, check out previous lookbooks featuring granite kitchens, terrazzo restaurants and atriums that brighten up residential spaces.


The photo is by Tommaso Riva

A Brutalist Tropical House, Indonesia, by Patisandhika and Dan Mitchell

Designer Dan Mitchell worked with architecture studio Patisandhika to create this brutalist home in Bali, which features a double-height living room filled with books, records and potted plants.

The house has a two-level design inspired by modernist architect Ray Kappe’s Kappe Residence. Inside, colorful objects, textiles and furnishings draw inspiration from the work of Clifford Still, Ellsworth Kelly and the Bauhaus movement to give the home a warm feel.

Read more about A Brutalist Tropical Home ›


Large living room with concrete ceiling
The photo is by Niveditaa Gupta

House of Concrete Experiences, India, by Samira Rathod

As the name suggests, House of Concrete Experiments features sculptural concrete walls. Warm wood details offset the gray hues, while the concrete floor has been inlaid with black stones to create an interesting pattern.

Large windows and geometric skylights help make the room bright and inviting.

Learn more about the House of Concrete Experiences ›


Turquoise table in a room with concrete walls
The photo is by Olmo Peeters

Riverside Tower Apartment, Belgium, by Studio Okami Architecten

Studio Okami Architecten stripped down the walls of this apartment in Antwerp’s Riverside Tower to let its original structure take center stage.

Colorful details such as a turquoise table and sky blue spiral staircase and a playful, sculptural lamp give the house a contemporary feel, while plenty of green plants bring more life to the otherwise gray interior.

Read more about Riverside Tower Apartment ›


Atrium bathed in light in brutalist house
The photo is from Photographix

Rough Concrete, India, by The Grid Architects

Designed as a “neo-brutalist” house, Beton Brut in India has a number of dramatic features, including a sky-lit atrium that stretches across the house.

The Grid Architects described the house as “characterized by bare concrete, geometric shapes, a monochromatic palette and a monolithic appearance”. Wooden floors and furniture and many textiles soften the brutalist interior of the house and its potentially severe appearance.

Learn more about Raw Concrete ›


Shakespeare Tower Apartment by Takero Shimazaki Architects
The photo is by Anton Gorlenko

Barbican Apartment, UK, by Takero Shimakazi Architects

This apartment in the brutalist Barbican estate of London’s Shakespeare Tower has been revamped by Takero Shimakazi Architects in a nod to the client’s close ties to Japan.

Details such as checkered wood paneling and wooden joinery have been added throughout the apartment, which also features Japanese-inspired details including a tatami-lined area.

Read more about the Barbican apartment ›


Debaixo do Bloco Arquitetura
The photo is by Joana Franca

Concrete house, Brazil, by Debaixo do Bloco Arquitetura

Debaixo do Bloco’s design for this sculptural home in Brazil is divided into three sections to provide a clear distinction between the various programs.

Inside, the interior has a mid-century modern feel, with glossy wooden flooring and a PH glass table lamp by Danish designer Louis Poulsen decorating a side table.

Learn more about the concrete house ›


An office table and chairs inside the office
The photo is by Lorenzo Zandri

Smithson Tower Office, UK, by ConForm

The brutalist Smithson Tower in Mayfair is the location of this “simple” office designed by ConForm Architects. The studio divided the space into eight zones defined by the solid structural grid of the existing building and added low-level millwork.

The result is a design that softens austere office spaces and makes rooms more intimate.

Learn more about the Smithson Tower Desk ›


The Standard Hotel in London by Shawn Hausman Design
Photo courtesy of The Standard

The Standard London, UK, by Shawn Hausman

Designer Shawn Hausman created the colorful interior of The Standard hotel in London, located in a brutalist building, to contrast “the greyness of London”.

“I would say with this property we were a bit more colorful than usual, and I think part of that works in contrast to the brutalist building the hotel is in,” Hausman explained.

In the bathrooms, tiled walls in pink and black stripes and pops of pale mint green give the room a fun, playful feel.

Read more about The Standard London ›


The Preston Hollow by Specht Architects
The photo is by Casey Dunn

Preston Hollow, USA, by Specht Architects

The long, undulating concrete volumes of Preston Hollow in Dallas were designed to reference the brutalist Texas architecture of the 1950s and 1960s, but the house was built to wrap around the courtyards, creating a lively, open feel.

Inside the low-rise buildings, mid-century modern-style furniture nods to the house’s architectural references, but the interior is updated with the addition of modern art.

Read more about Preston Hollow ›


Barbican apartment designed by John Pawson
The photo is by Gilbert McCarragher

Barbican Apartment, UK, by John Pawson

British architect John Pawson created this apartment in London’s Barbican building using his signature minimalist aesthetic.

The flat, which overlooks central London and has a small concrete balcony, was left almost empty with just a few pieces of furniture and light wooden surfaces. Three works of art, a Buddha sculpture and a grandfather clock are the only decorative elements in the space.

Read more about the Barbican apartment ›

This is the latest in our lookbook series, which is visually inspired by the Dezeen archives. For more inspiration, check out previous lookbooks featuring granite kitchens, terrazzo restaurants and atriums that brighten up residential spaces.

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The 2023 ARCHITECT Architecture & Interiors Awards are open for applications https://myrumah.net/the-2023-architect-architecture-interiors-awards-are-open-for-applications/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 16:57:42 +0000 https://myrumah.net/the-2023-architect-architecture-interiors-awards-are-open-for-applications/ ARCHITECT has opened the call for entries for its 2023 Architecture & Interiors Awards, recognizing outstanding and innovative projects in the fields of architecture and interior design. The winning entries for this year’s program will be published in the January/February 2023 issue of ARCHITECT with extensive online coverage. Any project carried out after July 2020 […]]]>

ARCHITECT has opened the call for entries for its 2023 Architecture & Interiors Awards, recognizing outstanding and innovative projects in the fields of architecture and interior design. The winning entries for this year’s program will be published in the January/February 2023 issue of ARCHITECT with extensive online coverage. Any project carried out after July 2020 is eligible. Click here to see last year’s winners.

Do you want to submit your project to the Architecture & Interiors Awards 2022? Here’s what you need to know:

Deadline for regular registration: Friday, October 1, 2022, 11:59 p.m. EST
Late registration deadline: October 14, 2022 11:59 PM EST

The program, now in its second year, offers 21 categories of projects in which to participate, encompassing areas of architecture, interior design and specialty detailing. The competition also charges a different fee depending on whether you register before the regular or late deadline, so start your registrations today!

Standard registration categories (Regular deadline: $160 | Late deadline: $210)

Architecture:

  1. Government and civic building: includes hospitals and healthcare, memorials, visitor or nature centers, infrastructure, airports, train stations, parking structures
  2. Institutional: includes educational institutions such as schools, libraries and universities
  3. Cultural building: includes museums, galleries, religious buildings, halls and theaters
  4. Hospitality: includes hotels, resorts and wineries
  5. Office building
  6. Sports and recreation: stadiums, arenas, fitness and recreation
  7. Adaptive Reuse/Historical Restoration
  8. Mixed use
  9. Landscape architecture: includes public or outdoor spaces, parks and playgrounds

Interiors:

  1. Large office interior (25,000 square feet or more)
  2. Small office interior (less than 25,000 square feet)
  3. Lobby and amenity area
  4. Brand experience
  5. Retail and showroom: includes pop-ups and temporary
  6. Leisure, health and wellness interior: includes spas, gyms, medical offices and hospital interiors
  7. Hospitality interior: bar/restaurant, hotel interiors, guesthouses and B&Bs
  8. Civic and cultural interior: museums, galleries, educational spaces and libraries
  9. Transportation interior: includes airports, bus and train stations, and parking structures
  10. Design for Impact: design with the community, projects that demonstrate a commitment to activism/social justice and social responsibility

Specialty Entry Categories (Regular Deadline: $130 | Late Deadline: $180)

  1. Innovative use of material
  2. Stairs

Click here to begin your application and read the full competition guidelines and eligibility criteria.

QUESTIONS? Check out our FAQs or email ardesignawards@zondahome.com

We look forward to seeing your entries!

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The emigrant becomes a giant projection screen https://myrumah.net/the-emigrant-becomes-a-giant-projection-screen/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 15:10:21 +0000 https://myrumah.net/the-emigrant-becomes-a-giant-projection-screen/ Kitsch Klimt on Chambers Street. Photo: Mark Zhelezoglo for the Hall of Lights Is there a more permanently obsolete workspace than a grand banking hall with fancy railings above the tellers and a round stone table for writing checks and filling out withdrawal slips? Stepping into the old Emigrant Savings Bank on Chambers Street feels […]]]>

Kitsch Klimt on Chambers Street.
Photo: Mark Zhelezoglo for the Hall of Lights

Is there a more permanently obsolete workspace than a grand banking hall with fancy railings above the tellers and a round stone table for writing checks and filling out withdrawal slips? Stepping into the old Emigrant Savings Bank on Chambers Street feels like stepping into the past, and not just because some of us barely remember cash, let alone savings books and the carbon paper. This public room dates from a time when daily routines were ennobled by design. Buying a stamp, consulting a library book, buying a train ticket, depositing a paycheck, paying a tax — each of the paperwork routines that kept society running — got a Beaux-Arts temple adorned with marble, as if greatness was the birthright of every New Yorker. Banks had specific architectural needs: all that marble and stone proclaimed a reassuring permanence, the certainty that your money was handled by sober people working within thick walls – and indeed, the walls survived the money.

Today we can perform most of these rituals without getting out of bed, and many spaces built for them have either found new uses or been abandoned. (You can, however, still read a book amid the Beaux-Arts opulence of the New York Public Library’s Rose Reading Room.) That the Emigrant Savings Bank still exists is a miracle of the moment. In the 1960s, the city planned to demolish it, along with several other nearby buildings, to make way for a new civic center. The project dragged on until the tax crisis of the 1970s made it thankfully unaffordable, and for years it was familiar to car owners as a place to pay parking tickets. Eventually, the Monuments Preservation Commission designated the hall as one of the few protected interiors in the city, which meant that it could not be destroyed (or significantly altered), but also that it could not not be used easily.

Lately, these ornate white marble elephants have turned into venues for fundraising and corporate parties. Once emblems of egalitarian democracy, they have become off-limits to anyone not on the guest list. Restaurant-club-events company Cipriani has taken over the Merchants’ Exchange, the Battery Maritime Building, the Cunard Building (including its lavish ticketing lobby), and the Bowery Savings Bank. On the other hand, the restored and reborn Emigrant Room is accessible to anyone with $30 and a taste for digital glitz. (The rest of the building has been converted into condos.) French company Culturespaces has turned it into the Hall of Lights, a home for the kind of wraparound digital art exhibit that might seem better suited to a featureless hangar rather than ‘to a capricious and tricky landmark. . The first in the Hall of Lights’ repertoire is “Gustav Klimt: Gold in Motion,” a 35-minute, multi-screen tribute to the master of all that glitters, created by Gianfranco Iannuzzi. (This is followed by a shorter tour through the work of artist and architect Friedensreich Hundertwasser, who designed one of Vienna’s most delightfully eerie apartment buildings.) Architecture firm Woods Bagot and preservation consultants Higgins Quasebarth & Partners oversaw a surgical restoration that maintained the bank from the inside while adapting it as a kind of black box. Several counters had to disappear, but the bulk remains, and the central table has been reinstalled. The Landmarks Preservation Commission objected to darkening windows facing Chambers Street, so that a set of curtains isolates a bright vestibule from the darkened heart of the space. The elliptical Beaux-Arts laylights on the ceiling have been restored to their vintage luster, now that decades-old cigarette smoke has been eliminated.

The Beaux-Arts interior depicts Vienna.

Architectural details are mostly intact, by order of the Landmarks Preservation Commission.

The windows were closed with curtains rather than blacked out.

Photographs: Mark Zhelezoglo for the Hall of Lights

That’s a lot of effort and expense to put into a design that the audience will only catch a glimpse of while waiting for the show to begin. Yet, deep in the DNA of the immersive art exhibition is the sound and light, a sound and light show invented for a Loire chateau in 1952 and popularized over the following decades, in which historical events were projected onto the facade of a monument or cathedral to a thundering soundtrack of scenic dialogue , music and cannon shots. Today, these quaint entertainments have gone extreme, with bustling facades that make Gothic architecture seem to dance and swell and digital trickery so exaggerated that ancient stone structures stand there awkwardly while their insubstantial avatars sway. have fun.

When the lights go out for Culturespaces’ latest extravaganza, the room’s structure remains visible, but its details are effectively painted over. New York becomes an ersatz of Vienna, and a beautiful space is transformed into another: the Kunsthistorisches Museum. First, a light pencil redraws the walls, columns and arches. Then the camera zooms in so close to the work that it practically flies across the surface.

The allure of the close-up is obvious. Ten years ago (and again in 2018), the real Kunsthistorisches Museum erected a temporary bridge over the main staircase so viewers could get up close to the murals Klimt painted there. It all seems so pointless… heavy, so boringly local. Why bother with all that scaffolding when you can turn paint into light, enlarge images even further, and wave them in front of a viewer thousands of miles away? There is perhaps no need to discuss the value of seeing real objects in the flesh. A century and more of recording, photography, video and 3D modeling hasn’t killed live performance or shut down art galleries.

And yet, all these dazzling simulacra create a desire for the real; anyone can spend the whole day contemplating mona-lisa in ultra high resolution online, but crowds still form to squint at the actual painting as it hides behind glass and a phalanx of selfie sticks. Paintings may seem two-dimensional, but they exist in a three-dimensional world. They have a weight, thickness, and physical presence that keep museums and auction houses going. Culturespace depends on audiences eager to see art reproductions in non-replicable environments, but the fact is that Klimt’s virtuosity is not heightened by being digitally splashed on every available surface. The hyperventilating, hyperreal yet psychedelic style of “Gold in Motion” eliminates the distinction between artwork and merchandising. It’s less an animated Klimt than an animated Klimt tie, the gift shop comes to life.

The video takes viewers through several stages of the artist’s career, but the carousel of images scrolls by so quickly that it’s impossible to study one or organize them into a story. What remains is a series of glimpses, a museum retrospective cut up and reassembled into enlarged, nervous fragments. The supposedly immersive experience peddles the ultimate superficial impression. Without narration, without context, without pauses to explain, we get a parade of floating images accompanied by music that varies from the apt (Mahler) to the anachronistic (Philip Glass). And because it’s family entertainment, Klimt’s libido-infused art gets an airplane movie edit, with sensibly cropped nudes, light on masturbation.

The section on the Viennese Secession winks at the central aspiration of the movement: an entire world conceived according to a set of new aesthetic principles at the turn of the 20th century. Architecture sticks to architecture, as Vienna’s bright botanical facades briefly occupy the bank’s curvaceous interiors. There’s an affinity here: the bank’s architect, Raymond Almirall, was a contemporary of Klimt and Josef Maria Olbrich (who designed the Secession Building in Vienna), though his heart and training are in Paris . The soft curves, elliptical shapes and clean classicism of the bank hall give it muted echoes of Viennese modernism. But why even establish these links if you want to reduce them to insignificance?

In only one case does Klimt’s work really lend itself to this digital dissolution. when he painted Beethoven frieze for the 14th exhibition of the Secession in 1902, it was intended to be almost as ephemeral as a symphonic performance. Once the show was over, the frieze would be removed. (Like the Emigrant Savings Bank, it survived by chance and now occupies its own gallery in the basement of the Secession Building.) The layering of artistic and musical genres and personalities who contributed to the event is dizzying. Klimt’s painting vibrates with the poetry of Schiller, Wagner’s retelling of Beethoven’s music, and Max Klinger’s sculpture of the composer as a stooped, shirtless hero, as well as the architecture of Olbrich. Iannuzzi steps in to add a digital layer to this palimpsest, rubbing the frieze with his camera as “Ode to Joy” blares over the speakers. But in every other sense, he ignores complexity, history and meaning, preferring gilt traffic.

Perhaps the immersion craze is a reaction to the hypnotic pull of the tiny screens we all carry around in our pockets. It is an invitation to look up and around rather than down, to inhabit an imaginary world instead of scrutinizing it in miniature. If so, its competition is not the museums or the works of art they keep locked away in their modest settings, but the ubiquity of digital glare. Of the multitudes who will line up for virtual Klimt, few may have seen his paintings in the flesh; many others were raised on CGI movies and sports-themed video games so vivid you can practically smell the sweat. Art and architecture are irrelevant; the main things are gold and movement.

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‘Sun’ circular lamp illuminates brando bleu ice cream shop in madrid https://myrumah.net/sun-circular-lamp-illuminates-brando-bleu-ice-cream-shop-in-madrid/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 01:07:36 +0000 https://myrumah.net/sun-circular-lamp-illuminates-brando-bleu-ice-cream-shop-in-madrid/ all blue brando ice cream shop in madrid, spain In the historic center of Madrid, Spainthe all-blue Brando by Solar and Marta Jarabo ice cream stands out from its urban environment and attracts the attention of passers-by. Bright blue floors, ceilings, and furniture decorate the interior, albeit rough polyurethane covered with moss the surfaces break […]]]>

all blue brando ice cream shop in madrid, spain

In the historic center of Madrid, Spainthe all-blue Brando by Solar and Marta Jarabo ice cream stands out from its urban environment and attracts the attention of passers-by. Bright blue floors, ceilings, and furniture decorate the interior, albeit rough polyurethane covered with moss the surfaces break the continuity and add texture to the space. Perhaps the most prominent feature of the design is a large sun lamp mounted just behind the ice counter that illuminates the interior.

According to the creators, Brando explores the relationship between visual perception and color phenomenology with the aim of developing a new business model in which consumption is understood as an atmospheric experience.

the Brando glacier stands out from its urban environment and attracts the attention of passers-by

all images courtesy of Imagen Subliminal

the pervasive use of color blurs the perception of scale

Solar (see more here) and Marta Jarabo (see more here) designed the brando glacier around Three basic local: down budget, the development of a recognizable image, and limit execution time. With these starting points in mind, they created an artificial landscape in which the pervasive use of color blurs the perception of scale. According to the designers, this strategy responds to an economy of means as an ecological manifesto, unifying the space and developer the different historical layers of the to place while to avoid demolition and minimize waste generation.

The entire interior is lined with bright shades of blue, to add a mischievous to touch at the interior and to improve the visitor live. The program is Split in of them parallel bands separate by projecting polyurethane covered with moss sections this serve as counters, bars, and work plans, allowing maximum flexibility in the remaining space. The centerpiece of the piece is a circular stretch fabric lamp that catches the eye of pedestrians outside. Thanks to the colors that change throughout the day, this luminous piece brings multiple physical and psycho-emotional qualities to the space, creating an immersive experience far from the traditional glacier.

'Sun' circular lamp illuminates brando bleu ice cream shop in madrid
large windows draw in natural light while a large sun-like lamp illuminates the interior

'Sun' circular lamp illuminates brando bleu ice cream shop in madrid
the lamp is installed just behind the ice cream bar, against the bright blue wall

bright 'sun' lamp illuminates the all blue interior of an ice cream shop in madrid, spain
the protruding sections covered with polyurethane foam serve as counters, bars and worktops, allowing maximum flexibility

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Boat shape: a classic art deco villa in Belgium with a touch of ocean chic | Interiors https://myrumah.net/boat-shape-a-classic-art-deco-villa-in-belgium-with-a-touch-of-ocean-chic-interiors/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://myrumah.net/boat-shape-a-classic-art-deco-villa-in-belgium-with-a-touch-of-ocean-chic-interiors/ YesVes Plançon, a French property developer who calls himself a “house collector”, was looking for a house in Brussels when he came across Villa Gaverzicht for sale in the province of Waregem, east of the Belgian capital. “When I discovered this place, I didn’t hesitate for a second,” he says. The house, built by a […]]]>

YesVes Plançon, a French property developer who calls himself a “house collector”, was looking for a house in Brussels when he came across Villa Gaverzicht for sale in the province of Waregem, east of the Belgian capital. “When I discovered this place, I didn’t hesitate for a second,” he says.

The house, built by a little-known Belgian architect named Gentiel Van Eeckhoutte in 1939, had stood empty for three years after his widow died aged 90. “I can understand why she lived here so long. It’s a very comfortable place to grow old,” says Plançon. Indeed, with all these semicircular shapes, balustrades and round windows that imitate the portholes of a ship, it looks like a luxury liner.

“For a year, I read a lot about the architecture of this interwar period,” says Plançon, “and it was only then that I started the restoration.”

“Everything looks as it did in 1939, when it was completed”: the villa’s magnificent living room, with its curved ceiling and windows. Photography: Jan Verlinde/Living Inside

He was also lucky. Villa Gaverzicht was virtually intact. “The house has been listed since 2009. The Cubex kitchen, the luxurious bathroom with marble tiles, the monumental staircase and the stained glass windows: almost everything looks as it did in 1939 when it was completed”, he said.

“Curiously, the interior had been preserved thanks to the poor taste of the widow’s new companion. He put a terrible floor on the original floor, which saved the beautiful tiles. A lousy wallpaper covered the original paint on the walls. The aluminum and plastic doors have been replaced with copies of the original doors. Little had disappeared. And what was missing was rebuilt, based on the original plans.

Plançon discovered an enormous number of original drawings and plans for the Villa Gaverzicht in the basement of the house. The archive also contained plans for other Van Eeckhoutte projects in Flanders, on the Belgian coast and on the French coast. “I even discovered plans for burial monuments, barns and agricultural machinery that no one knew existed. Studying the plans, I understood that the Villa Gaverzicht was his masterpiece. It was the house where he showed his skills in the most advanced way. This villa even had central heating and a luxurious bathroom, quite rare for the time.

Villa Gaverzicht - Belgium
Oceans apart: the distinctive rounding
shapes and ocher tiles on the facade of the villa.
Photography: Jan Verlinde/Living Inside

Entering the house feels like walking on a film set, perfect for a Gatsby the magnificent do it again in Belgium. In the glamorous entrance hall, a green glass ball lamp illuminates the original staircase banister, which leads to the bedrooms and a billiard room. Railings and rounded door openings are a reference to boat design. Almost all the details of the house that you see are original, even the period furniture, which was carefully selected by Plançon, in collaboration with the decorator Rémy Motte. “I have a huge collection of art deco glass. Since I was 20, I have regularly bought works of art at auction. Whenever I see something better that would fit here, I replace it. Friends or neighbors also give me art deco furniture. They know that I want to recreate the atmosphere as faithfully as possible.

Van Eeckhoutte’s fascination with the architect Le Corbusier is clear at Villa Gaverzicht. Ochre, blue, orange and green, typical colors of Le Corbusier, are a subtle reference used throughout the house. Horizontal windows dominate the rear facades and the flat roof originally featured a small swimming pool – typical of Le Corbusier who often added recreational features to the roofs of his houses. Even the reinforced concrete construction, which allows an open plan, takes up the principles of the Franco-Swiss architect. Plançon designed the geometric paths of the garden in reference to those of Le Corbusier’s Villa Savoye in Poissy.

“Villa Gaverzicht was the architect's masterpiece.  This villa even had central heating, which was rare at the time”: owner Yves Plançon, “collector of houses”.
“Villa Gaverzicht was the architect’s masterpiece. This villa even had central heating, which was rare at the time”: owner Yves Plançon, “collector of houses”. Photography: Jan Verlinde/Living Inside

In the office, there are beautiful custom-made cupboards, where Van Eeckhoutte has perfectly integrated both its waste bin, its cloakroom and its storage system for its plans. But the highlight of the show is the stained glass window. “Exactly what this represents is still a mystery to me,” says Plançon. “But I also see triangles, compasses and a cathedral: elements that could indicate that he was a Freemason.”

The hardest part of the restoration was finding the original materials. “There are still bakelite switches, black and red. But it is very difficult to find marbrite glass tiles, a Belgian innovation from the Verreries de Fauquez glassworks,” explains Plançon. “In the kitchen, a few pale yellow tiles are broken. In the upstairs bathroom, the green marble is almost intact.

For fans of obscure pop, this bathroom might tell you something: Arbeid Adelt, a Belgian group from the 1980s, shot the cover of their album Jonge Helden here in 1983. “It’s no coincidence that the singer put on his Le Corbusier glasses for the photo, is it?” said Plançon.

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Old and new house / Objekt Architecten https://myrumah.net/old-and-new-house-objekt-architecten/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://myrumah.net/old-and-new-house-objekt-architecten/ Old and new house / Objekt Architecten © Ypsilon Corporate Photography + 30 To share To share Facebook Twitter Mail pinterest WhatsApp Or https://www.archdaily.com/988652/old-and-new-house-objekt-architecten Area Area of ​​this architecture project Area : 490 m² Year Year of realization of this architectural project Year: 2022 Photographs Manufacturers Marks with products used in this architecture project Manufacturers: […]]]>

Old and new house / Objekt Architecten

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