Interior Architecture – My Rumah http://myrumah.net/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 21:19:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://myrumah.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Interior Architecture – My Rumah http://myrumah.net/ 32 32 Jessie Andrews’ warm white living room is a favorite spot in her LA home | Architectural Summary https://myrumah.net/jessie-andrews-warm-white-living-room-is-a-favorite-spot-in-her-la-home-architectural-summary/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 21:19:46 +0000 https://myrumah.net/jessie-andrews-warm-white-living-room-is-a-favorite-spot-in-her-la-home-architectural-summary/ Welcome to our new series, Want a room, where we ask interesting people about a favorite room in their house. From minimalist living rooms to vibrant kitchens, we focus on the best features of the most enviable rooms. Add an interior enthusiast to Jessie’s list of hobbies. Photo: Dirk May Which: Jessie Andrews is a […]]]>

Welcome to our new series, Want a room, where we ask interesting people about a favorite room in their house. From minimalist living rooms to vibrant kitchens, we focus on the best features of the most enviable rooms.

Add an interior enthusiast to Jessie’s list of hobbies.

Photo: Dirk May

Which: Jessie Andrews is a retired adult film actress turned model and creative. Not only is she the founder of the jewelry brand Bagatiba; minimalist swimwear brand, Basic Swim; and chic ready-to-wear line, Jeu Illimité; but she also recently opened Tase Gallery, an immersive art and shopping space in LA

Or: Jessie bought her minimalist 1930s home in a historically preserved Los Angeles neighborhood just over a year ago. Since living in a historic home comes with a unique set of challenges due to preservation codes, she focuses on decorating the space with second-hand pieces and artwork that she made with friends, rather than making major changes to the architectural structure.

Sour cream curtains were paired with off-white walls and warm wood hues throughout the room.

Photo: Jessie Andrews

Inspiration and aesthetics: Jessie’s favorite part of her house is the living room. “I grew up in Spanish-style homes in Miami,” she explains. “When I moved to LA, I lived in a downtown loft, and it took me almost 10 years to make it comfortable and figure out what style of interior design I really liked for a I have always been inspired by architecture and design, not just interiors. Jessie visited Italy a few times and immediately fell in love with the culture and history, and decided to decorate his home with that in mind.” It’s one of my biggest influences to live by – a laid-back, comfortable mentality mixed with my obsession with the clutter and pace of New York City. Aesthetically, I am drawn to cohesive and minimalist, yet lived-in spaces,” she says.

Square feet: The living room itself is approximately 500 square feet with 10 foot ceilings. Jessie became enchanted with the room when she first saw it because of the windows on almost every wall and the fireplace.

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Urban-gro adds $2 million to its share buyback program https://myrumah.net/urban-gro-adds-2-million-to-its-share-buyback-program/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 00:09:03 +0000 https://myrumah.net/urban-gro-adds-2-million-to-its-share-buyback-program/ Just weeks after disclosing a preliminary sales report indicating record revenues in 2021, Urban-gro Inc. (Nasdaq: UGRO) is adding $2 million to its stock buyback program, which now totals $7 million. “We are pleased to announce the extension of our share buyback program which allows us to return value to our shareholders,” UG CEO Bradley […]]]>

Just weeks after disclosing a preliminary sales report indicating record revenues in 2021, Urban-gro Inc. (Nasdaq: UGRO) is adding $2 million to its stock buyback program, which now totals $7 million.

“We are pleased to announce the extension of our share buyback program which allows us to return value to our shareholders,” UG CEO Bradley Nattrass said in a statement. “This action underscores our confidence in the strength of our balance sheet, the quality of our assets and our continued ability to generate free cash flow. At recent market price levels, we believe the buyback program is an excellent opportunity to purchase our common shares at a significant discount to their intrinsic value and presents an attractive investment.

Urban-gro announced this month that it expects to record $62 million in sales for fiscal 2021, an increase of more than 140% over the previous year.

“The timing and amount of share repurchases under the program, if any, will be at the discretion of management and will depend on a variety of factors, including price, available cash, general business and market conditions. and other investment opportunities,” the company said. said in a press release.

Urban-gro’s share price hovered around $9.50 on Tuesday and is down more than 10% since the start of 2022.

If the company decides to buy back shares, chances are the current price undervalues ​​the company and will rise.

Urban-gro had an eventful 2021. In February, it went public with an initial public offering of $62.1 million. In June, Urban-gro purchased architecture and interior design company MJ12 Design Studio for $9 million, making it the first integrated architecture, engineering and culture company in the field of marijuana. In August, it posted a quarterly profit for the first time in its history.

This month, Urban-gro invested $2.5 million in XS Financial (CSE: XSF), a company that provides financing and equipment leasing services to cannabis businesses.

Urban-gro was also hit with $5.1 million in what it called fraudulent wire transfers in October and is suing its bank for allegedly allowing the fraud to occur.

This article was first published by BizWest, an independent news agency, and is published under a license agreement. © 2022 BizWestMedia LLC.

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MoDusArchitects unveils icaro hotel, a forest of columns in the dolomites https://myrumah.net/modusarchitects-unveils-icaro-hotel-a-forest-of-columns-in-the-dolomites/ Mon, 17 Jan 2022 07:47:02 +0000 https://myrumah.net/modusarchitects-unveils-icaro-hotel-a-forest-of-columns-in-the-dolomites/ modusarchitects goes to the dolomites at the foothills of italy’s dolomite mountain range and nestled within a network of ski slopes and hiking trails, MoDusArchitects has revitalized the historic icaro hotel as a stereometric wooden volume. the renovation project humbly adds a new layer to the heritage of the welcoming architecture of this unique protected […]]]>

modusarchitects goes to the dolomites

at the foothills of italy’s dolomite mountain range and nestled within a network of ski slopes and hiking trails, MoDusArchitects has revitalized the historic icaro hotel as a stereometric wooden volume. the renovation project humbly adds a new layer to the heritage of the welcoming architecture of this unique protected space.

images © gustav willeit | @sangu

the humble origins of hotel icaro

located on the alpe di siusi in the UNESCO world heritage site of the south tyrol dolomites, hotel icaro’s humble origins (see more here) date back to a simple 1930s mountain lodge before its renovation by MoDusArchitects (see more here). granddaughter of the hotel’s original founder commissioned the studio to overhaul the structure and reinvent its identity. the various interventions include an underground parking extension, separate staff quarters, a guest bedroom addition, the reorganization of all common areas including the swimming pool, and the vast giant wooden colonnade along the main facade which catches breathtaking mountain views.

icaro hotel modusarchitects

the structure of the wooden cabin

in plan, the new addition mirrors the existing west wing along the axis of the original lodge to forge a symmetry of rooms to the entire relationship. externally, the thickened jagged larch skin, together with the large pitched timber roof and timber columns, constitute a system of ordering that subsumes the myriad past alterations into a cohesive architectural body.

the thirteen branching wooden columns descend along the south-facing façade and span the two upper floors. these structural elements tie the roof in place and serve as an intermediate framework through which guests measure themselves against the architecture and the landscape. the first floor terrace draws a straight line through the two distant corners of the building to define an airy, double-height loggia that extends the interior spaces of the guest rooms outwards.

icaro hotel modusarchitects icaro hotel modusarchitects MoDusArchitects unveils its icaro hotel, a forest of wooden columns in the dolomites MoDusArchitects unveils its icaro hotel, a forest of wooden columns in the dolomites

project info:

Project title: hotel | @icaro_hotel

architecture: MoDusArchitects | @modus.architects

site: piz 18/1, alpe di siusi, castelrotto, bolzano, italy

group project: sandy attia, matteo scagnol, filippo pesavento

customer: Angelika Sattler

completion: August 2021

photography: © gustav willeit | @sangu

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A Modern Twist on Middle Eastern Aesthetics in Beirut | Interiors https://myrumah.net/a-modern-twist-on-middle-eastern-aesthetics-in-beirut-interiors/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 16:26:00 +0000 https://myrumah.net/a-modern-twist-on-middle-eastern-aesthetics-in-beirut-interiors/ Ohen furniture designer Nada Debs first moved to Beirut from London in 2000 in a bid to reconnect with her Lebanese roots, her parents gifted her the apartment they had purchased in the 1980s. back then, it was rented and they just said, ‘Why don’t you take it?’ So it was more of a marriage […]]]>

Ohen furniture designer Nada Debs first moved to Beirut from London in 2000 in a bid to reconnect with her Lebanese roots, her parents gifted her the apartment they had purchased in the 1980s. back then, it was rented and they just said, ‘Why don’t you take it?’ So it was more of a marriage of convenience than the thunderclap of love at first sight.

Located on the 10th floor of a 1970s building in a residential neighborhood in West Beirut, the space was nothing immediately remarkable.

“The apartment is not something I would have chosen,” Debs says. “But I made the most of it and because it was simple, I had a lot of freedom to use my furniture. I would prototype, take it out and see what it looked like, before making it collections. I used my house as a sort of place for experimentation.

When Debs first got her hands on the apartment, she began to imprint her vision of the space, knocking down the walls to let in light and make the most of the stunning sea and mountain views.

“When I arrived in Lebanon, I was looking for furniture from the Middle East and I realized that it was stuck in the past”: designer Nada Debs, on her Yves Klein Blue sofa. Photography: Ianniello / Living Inside

“I love breaking down walls,” she says with a happy wink. “The apartment was originally designed for a family and had four bedrooms, but it’s just me here so I tried to make it less for a family and more of an entertaining space.”

Today, her home is flooded with light as Debs leads the way through a series of elegant living spaces, bursting with jewel colors. Her curvaceous Yves Klein Blue sofa, which she designed herself, is a striking focal point. “I’m a big fan of blue – Beirut blue is beautiful. And every day the color of that sea and sky is different, so that definitely influenced me,” she says.

Then there’s the cozy pink kitchen/dining room, which was inspired by the lush visuals of the film shot in Hong Kong. love mood. From here we walk through the yellow TV room, which was originally the balcony, but now serves as an indoor/outdoor living space that catches the morning sun.

“I always like to start with the color or the color combinations, before thinking about the shape and then, finally, I get to the details,” she says. “In this house, each room is thematic. I wouldn’t do this for a client, but it’s more of an experimental space and I think the colors work together.

The living space with a dark door and an oval table on a rug
“Dramatic dark doors add an extra layer of sophistication, while area rugs play a key role: the living space. Photography: Ianniello / Living Inside

And with three different living rooms to choose from, there’s a room for every mood. “It’s, ‘Oh, am I going to be blue today or am I going to be yellow today?’ And it’s really interesting, when I have guests, people are drawn to different colors. Some people look at the pink room and say, ‘Oh I’m not going, it’s a little too cozy, I won’t get up again.’ So it’s more for later in the evening.

Dramatic dark doors add an extra layer of sophistication, while area rugs play a key role in separating spaces.

“I based the apartment on carpeting first,” says Debs. “When you have an open space, it’s really hard to put the furniture in first, but when you put down a rug that defines the space.”

When it comes to shape, Nada is big on rounded corners and spherical shapes, in part because they make a home more user-friendly, “we’re just looking for things that are soft when we want to touch that we all need, especially right now after Covid.

the yellow room.
A room for every mood: the yellow living room. Photography: Ianniello / Living Inside

But also because it allows him to push the limits with the machine. “The Romania dining room table uses a technique called marquetry strips and I noticed I could bend it, so I decided to create a whole line of furniture where I could do that,” he explains. she.

Of course, the large apartment, with its clean lines and open space, is the perfect backdrop for his striking furniture and many pieces, like the Coffee Bean coffee table, so named because his son, who was six at at the time, said it looked like a coffee bean, are available to order on its website.

Despite her own sleek, streamlined aesthetic, Debs is wary of hotel-like interior spaces. “Too perfect is soulless. You have to have trinkets,” she said firmly. “A house should be personalized and not so rigid. The frame can be a little off to the side, it doesn’t have to be perfect, that’s okay.

For her part, she likes to mix finds from the Basta antiques market in Beirut alongside favorite works of art and strange family heirlooms, like the oversized round Chinese terracotta rug in the living room, which her uncle bought out in Shanghai in the 1950s.

contemporary furniture in the dining room.
Refined aesthetics: contemporary furniture in the dining room. Photography: Ianniello / Living Inside

Originally trained in interior architecture at the prestigious Rhode Island School of Design in the United States, Debs had worked with marquetry in the United Kingdom, a technique used to create patterns on furniture, but her move to Beirut inspired a bold new direction in his work.

“When I arrived in Lebanon, I was looking for Middle Eastern furniture and realized it was stuck in the past,” she says. “Everyone was buying B&B furniture imported from Italy, and all these contemporary European brands, and they were neglecting their own furniture because it was too dated. I was like, ‘Where is the Middle Eastern furniture?’ And that didn’t exist. So I made my own.” She began working with local artisans and artisans, reconfiguring Middle Eastern designs to give them a more contemporary feel.

“Because I grew up in Japan, I introduced my Japanese aesthetic, which is about simplifying and bringing things down to their essence.” They didn’t think they were allowed to do that. They stuck to the old ways, because that was what they thought was the right thing to do. But I kind of gave them the OK. You could change the patterns. You can change patterns, you can keep it simple, and suddenly you open this whole door.

The concrete tiles that line the wall of the yellow TV area with their modern take on traditional Middle Eastern geometric patterns and the white arabesque chairs with their swirling foliage pattern and lattice screen, are all examples of his “neo-Arab” aesthetic, as she calls it.

“When I moved to Beirut, after Japan where no one was like me, I was looking for like-minded people, but I realized that I was not Lebanese either, because of my upbringing, so my work reflects that,” she explains. “It’s the little twist of my work, because the Japanese style is quite sober, while in the Middle East everything is exaggerated.”

nadadebs.com

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The 34-year-old Singaporean designer who worked alongside architect MBS Moshe Safdie https://myrumah.net/the-34-year-old-singaporean-designer-who-worked-alongside-architect-mbs-moshe-safdie/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 22:37:30 +0000 https://myrumah.net/the-34-year-old-singaporean-designer-who-worked-alongside-architect-mbs-moshe-safdie/ One of the first things Simon Chiang tells me when we sit down for a chat one afternoon is that he doesn’t identify with the label of interior designer or architect. Instead, he prefers the term spatial designer, one who considers how people live, move and interact in the spaces that matter to them. However, […]]]>

One of the first things Simon Chiang tells me when we sit down for a chat one afternoon is that he doesn’t identify with the label of interior designer or architect. Instead, he prefers the term spatial designer, one who considers how people live, move and interact in the spaces that matter to them.

However, he is not the type to pigeonhole himself.

It’s a philosophy that has carried him through his years as an architecture student at the National University of Singapore (NUS), as an architectural associate at some of the biggest names in industry locally and abroad, starting his own company at age 30, and finally, where he is now – creative director of German bespoke modular interiors builder, Kuhlmann International.

Chiang was born to a Hong Kong family in Michigan, USA, where his father worked. When she was six, her family moved to Singapore. Growing up, Chiang was always intrigued by buildings and architecture.

“My father traveled a lot and always brought back postcards from New York with all these buildings and skyscrapers. As a young child, I was inspired by buildings,” he recalls. He also remembers spending much of his time drawing.

“I didn’t have any computer games. When my family went out, like when we went to church or dinner with family friends, my mom would bring lots of recycled paper from my dad’s company with a pencil. I would sit on the floor, the papers would be placed on a chair, and I would just start drawing,” he shared.

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Major Frog Level Brewing Expansion Bodes Well for Waynesville | News https://myrumah.net/major-frog-level-brewing-expansion-bodes-well-for-waynesville-news/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 22:30:00 +0000 https://myrumah.net/major-frog-level-brewing-expansion-bodes-well-for-waynesville-news/ A planned major expansion for Frog Level Brewing will not only pave the way for the revitalization of Frog Level to finally take off, but will also bring far-reaching benefits to all of downtown Waynesville. The owners of Frog Level Brewing are renting out the 20,000 square foot building that once housed the Open Door […]]]>

A planned major expansion for Frog Level Brewing will not only pave the way for the revitalization of Frog Level to finally take off, but will also bring far-reaching benefits to all of downtown Waynesville.

The owners of Frog Level Brewing are renting out the 20,000 square foot building that once housed the Open Door Soup Kitchen and the Second Blessing Thrift Store. Once renovated, it will house an extension of the bar and a new dining room, in addition to serving as an event and entertainment space.

The park-like outdoor gathering space behind Frog Level Brewing will be extended along the banks of Richland Creek to create a seamless riverside experience.

“Being right along the river, we can keep adding more picnic tables, intimate seating areas, and fire pits to have some sort of a river walk area,” said Morgan Crisp, one from the owners of Frog Level Brewing.

The long-term vision does not end there. The owners’ goal is to turn Frog Level into a miniature version of the River Arts District in Asheville.

“We want artists there, we want more food there – whoever comes over there with us will only add to the value,” Crisp said. “We see so much potential there. “

Attempts to revitalize Frog Level over the years had been hampered by the presence of the Open Door soup kitchen, which served as a magnet for the homeless. Wanderers slept in alleys and doorways, strolled past shops at all hours of the day, caused public disturbance and left a trail of rubbish in the streets and sidewalks.

Police responded to an average of three calls per day at Frog Level, including fights, vandalism, drug overdoses and drunk and disorderly driving.

Things improved almost overnight when the open door closed in mid-2020, a forced decision when the owners of the building refused to renew her lease – and possibly closing the chapter on the sordid reputation of Frog Level as a meeting place for the homeless.

Evolution of the brewery

Frog Level Brewing has been a rare bright spot in Frog Level’s attempt to revitalize the past decade, thanks to entrepreneur Clark Williams who started the business in 2011. After 10 years of operation, Williams took over his business. retired in early 2020 and sold the business to two couples: Travis and Morgan Crisp and Frank and Julia Bonomo.

They already had their own small-scale brewing business called Seven Clans Brewing, a name that paid homage to Morgan’s Cherokee roots. But they didn’t have a location of their own, so they made beer in small batches using the equipment at BearWaters Brewing in Canton.

The purchase of Frog Level Brewing provided Seven Clans with its own base of operations.

“We wanted a place for Seven Clans, but creating a new brewery from scratch is a process,” Morgan Crisp said. “It made sense for us to take over Frog Level, but there was also a story there. “

The owners kept the Frog Level name for their retail storefront given its already large number of subscribers.

The following has grown by leaps and bounds over the past two years. Despite a rocky start – they opened the day before the statewide COVID lockdowns went into effect – the business has exploded.

“It was really amazing,” Morgan Crisp said. “We weren’t expecting to do as well as we did, and that’s how we were able to grow.”

Even before the latest development to rent the huge building next door, couples were in a mode of continuous expansion since opening their doors.

They modernized the brewing equipment and tripled the production capacity almost immediately. Then comes a major extension of the kitchen to increase the food supply. Then they created a new living area by renting a space next door and knocking down a wall.

Meanwhile, they are also preparing to open a Seven Clans faucet room in Asheville.

The new space

The gaping building that housed the thrift store and soup kitchen was originally fodder and seeds, reminiscent of the days of the railroads and warehouses of Frog Level. The interior architecture could not be more perfect for a rustic style bar, lounge and event venue.

“It’s a super cool space. It will have the same originality of the feeding and seed experience, and that original rocket is what makes it special, ”Morgan Crisp said.

There are 30 foot ceilings, beautiful original floors and all brick walls. While the thrift store side of the building had been cut up with dividing walls over the years, these will be destroyed to create a large space.

The rear of the building is flanked by long loading docks, which will be used to create an open-air barn-style setting that flows into the outdoor seating area and the river promenade.

Meanwhile, the side of the building that housed the Open Door soup kitchen has ample commercial kitchen space and could potentially house a stand-alone restaurant. The options are limitless.

The couples also plan to rent the venue for wedding receptions and events.

“We already get so many requests from people to rent our brewery,” Morgan Crisp said.

There is also the potential to host large music concerts – something for which there is no venue for downtown Waynesville currently.

The couples recently purchased another small building at Frog Level that also supports Richland Creek, located next to the Cabinetry Shop, creating even more redevelopment opportunities at Frog Level.

There is already a charge for parking at Frog Level, but there is plenty of free parking nearby. There is a large city parking lot just two blocks from the Old Armory, and the parking lot is just four blocks away.

“When we start to grow we will need to educate people a bit more about where they can park,” Morgan Crisp said.

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Volkswagen ID.Buzz design, fundamentals, technical details and more https://myrumah.net/volkswagen-id-buzz-design-fundamentals-technical-details-and-more/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 03:30:00 +0000 https://myrumah.net/volkswagen-id-buzz-design-fundamentals-technical-details-and-more/ Posted on Jan 10, 2022 9:00:00 AM The ID.Buzz is supposed to pave the way for Volkswagen’s autonomous driving technology, with Level 4 support coming by 2025. The all-electric Volkswagen ID.Buzz minivan has been in the works for some time, and now Volkswagen has finally announced the production model reveal date. The much-anticipated, retro-styled ID.Buzz […]]]>

Posted on Jan 10, 2022 9:00:00 AM

The ID.Buzz is supposed to pave the way for Volkswagen’s autonomous driving technology, with Level 4 support coming by 2025.

The all-electric Volkswagen ID.Buzz minivan has been in the works for some time, and now Volkswagen has finally announced the production model reveal date. The much-anticipated, retro-styled ID.Buzz will premiere on March 9, a date that was revealed on social media by Volkswagen and its CEO Herbert Diess.

  • The ID.Buzz will be VW’s fourth dedicated electric vehicle in the ID family
  • Teaser features the official ID.Buzz design, though still camouflaged
  • Will be the first identification model to be offered as both a passenger and utility vehicle

Volkswagen ID.Buzz: exterior design

Volkswagen also released a teaser image showcasing the ID.Buzz with rainbow camouflage and the model’s headlights exposed, previewing the official design of the next-gen MPV. Volkswagen had only once revealed the model’s design with the same rainbow camouflage, which showed a pre-production version of the multi-seat MPV last year.

A lot of previous concepts styling cues have also been toned down, making the new ID model look cleaner and, perhaps, less heavily artificial than originally intended.

Key exterior design details on display in the latest photographs include angular headlamps that wrap around the front fenders. They are connected by a light strip that runs through a large VW badge highlighted on a slanted hood. Further down, there is a full-width grille similar to that of the concept.

As with the Microbus, the production version of the ID.Buzz adopts two classic hinged doors at the front and two parallel sliding doors at the rear.

Volkswagen ID.Buzz: the basics

Based on Volkswagen’s MEB electric vehicle platform, the new MPV will be offered in standard wheelbase and long wheelbase versions, the latter not scheduled for launch until 2023. Both models will offer a variety of seating and interior configurations.

The production ID.Buzz takes a more boxy shape than the previous concept in a move aimed at providing it with maximum interior space, Volkswagen officials told our sister publication Autocar UK.

The overall silhouette mirrors that of Volkswagen’s latest internal combustion engine Microbus, with which the new ID model is said to share elements of its bodywork, chassis and interior architecture.

It is slated to hit the market in Europe in the second half of 2022 and will become Volkswagen’s fourth dedicated electric model, following the recently unveiled ID.3, ID.4 and ID.5. It will also be the first ID model to be offered as both a passenger vehicle and a commercial vehicle, with production scheduled to take place at VW’s commercial vehicle plant in Hanover, Germany from this year.

Technical details of the new ID model have yet to be announced, although there are plans to share its transmission and battery setups with other ID badge-bearing models.

Volkswagen ID.Buzz paves the way for autonomous driving

Significantly, the ID.Buzz is also expected to play a crucial role in the launch of Volkswagen’s autonomous driving technology, which the company is developing in partnership with American start-up Argo AI. Upon launch this year, it is expected to be equipped with semi-autonomous Level 2 functionality, as seen in other MEB-based models, but Volkswagen says it is working to introduce the level capability. 4 in 2025. Volkswagen had even presented a prototype of the ID.Buzz AD, where AD stands for Autonomous Driving, at the 2021 Munich Motor Show. It was fitted with cameras, lidar and radar sensors to enable the autonomous technology developed by Argo.

Volkswagen Group’s sister company Moia has already confirmed that it will be the first company to use the autonomous driving features that are expected to be made available on ID.Buzz.

Volkswagen in India

While Volkswagen is in full swing in its overseas electrification strategy, the brand has yet to announce its plans for India. The automaker is currently focusing on the India 2.0 strategy where it has had fairly good success with the Taigun midsize SUV. The second product on the MQB-A0-IN platform will be the all-new Virtus sedan which will finally replace the aging Vento and set to launch around April.

What do you think of the Volkswagen ID.Buzz? Let us know in the comments below.

Also see:

Volkswagen committed to diesel despite global electrification plans

Copyright (c) Autocar France. All rights reserved.


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San Diego’s most expensive home sales in 2021 https://myrumah.net/san-diegos-most-expensive-home-sales-in-2021/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 13:30:54 +0000 https://myrumah.net/san-diegos-most-expensive-home-sales-in-2021/ 1/5 17111 El Vuelo in Rancho Santa Fe sold for $ 22.9 million in 2021. It was the seventh biggest sale in San Diego County history. (Preview first) 2/5 17111 El Vuelo in Rancho Santa Fe sold for $ 22.9 million in 2021. It was the seventh biggest sale in San Diego County history. (Preview […]]]>

El Vuelo’s house makes up for its distance from the beach by being the largest on this year’s list. The estate is 22,500 square feet and the land is 33 acres.

It has an interesting history as the former property of Gene Klein, former owner of the San Diego Chargers, and later bought by Andrew Viterbi, co-founder of Qualcomm. The house was demolished and rebuilt, a process that took seven years. Viterbi donated the house to UC San Diego, and the buyer in 2021 was Florida billionaire Herbert Wortheim.

At nearly $ 23 million, the Wortheim purchase makes it the eighth-biggest sale in San Diego County history.

“This is a very contemporary house, which is unique to Rancho Santa Fe,” said listing agent Jason Barry.

Property features include large windows to maximize views of the mountains and valleys, gourmet kitchen, solar panels that can power the whole house, smart home features, and gardens with exotic plants and flowers imported from across the country. ‘South America, Australia and South Africa. Sporting activities are everywhere on the property with a swimming pool, cricket pitch, putting green and stadium-style tennis court.

There is plenty of space for a large family or a lot of guests. There are six bedrooms, eight bathrooms and a garage for five cars.


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A Spanish mystery: Is a “masked restorer” to blame for the botched repair of a church? https://myrumah.net/a-spanish-mystery-is-a-masked-restorer-to-blame-for-the-botched-repair-of-a-church/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 15:08:29 +0000 https://myrumah.net/a-spanish-mystery-is-a-masked-restorer-to-blame-for-the-botched-repair-of-a-church/ CASTRONUÑO, Spain – The Romanesque church that stands above the river in the Spanish village of Castronuño looked like many others dotting the country: not too run-down for a 750-year-old man, but not particularly well-maintained no more. Then in November, Mayor Enrique Seoane noticed something that shocked him and caused a scandal in Spain. In […]]]>

CASTRONUÑO, Spain – The Romanesque church that stands above the river in the Spanish village of Castronuño looked like many others dotting the country: not too run-down for a 750-year-old man, but not particularly well-maintained no more.

Then in November, Mayor Enrique Seoane noticed something that shocked him and caused a scandal in Spain.

In a photo taken by one of his neighbors, Mr. Seoane saw a very modern seam of cement that someone had sunk into a decidedly ancient archway. It was apparently a homemade repair job to prevent the east flank of the church from collapsing.

The work was carried out by an unknown “masked restaurateur”, the mayor told a local reporter in a story that quickly spread across Spain.

While it may evoke visions of a superhero secretly helping an aging church, this is not how the mayor’s words played in Spain. Instead, they awoke bad memories in a country whose small towns and villages had previously been scarred by the horrors that this kind of vigilante redress efforts leave behind.

The figure of the benefactor gone wrong was embodied in Spain by Cecilia Giménez, a grandmother then in the 1980s, who made headlines around the world after her botched restoration of a century-old fresco of Jesus crowned with thorns called “Ecce Homo”. The result was so failed that the authorities initially thought that the painting had been vandalized.

Spanish art and architectural restorers have sworn to arrest these amateur and unwanted restorers.

However, in Castronuño, in the province of Valladolid north-west of Madrid, a mysterious character had struck again, this time at the Church of Santa María del Castillo, built around 1250 by the Knights Hospitaller of Saint John of Jerusalem.

Miguel Ángel García, spokesperson for the Heritage Association of the Province of Valladolid, a small consortium of local residents who try to prevent this kind of parody, among his other conservation efforts, came to take a look to damage during a recent freezing evening. He looked up at the cement, sadly, as the wind blew through a stork’s nest in the church steeple.

“The story of ‘Ecce Homo’ keeps repeating itself across the country,” he said.

You could say that Castronuño’s problem is Spain’s problem: this ancient land just has too many old things to fix. There are Phoenician forts, Celtic castles, Moorish minarets, Roman ramparts, Greek granite tombs – all left behind by past civilizations that came here to conquer, all determined to leave something to posterity.

Even the name of the Spanish heart, Castile, means something like “land of castles,” as many were built after 800 years of battles between Christian and Muslim rulers.

As she stood in front of the damaged Castronuño church one recent day, Mar Villarroel, a children’s book writer who is also the hamlet’s part-time tourism promoter, observed that while Spain’s blessing was on ‘she had so much history, so her curse was that so much was in danger of being lost through negligence.

Take the old castle, she said, whose village had been named, but which had been razed by Ferdinand II of Aragon during the time of Columbus. Or Castronuño’s first church – built even earlier than the one in use today, but demolished in 1919 (decades after its roof collapsed).

More recently, the villagers had begged the government and the Roman Catholic Archdiocese to come and repair Santa María del Castillo before it suffered the same fate.

But with no sign of help on the way, someone was urged to take matters into their own hands.

“Cement is a scandal, it’s ugly, yes,” Ms. Villarroel said. “But do you want to know the real scandal? It is because the leaders let the church do so.

José Antonio Conde, a sort of church keeper called a sacristan, was trying to find the key one evening recently. Only four people had copies, he said, and at least three appeared to be out of town. Finally, a sister of a child picked up the phone. He rushed to find her.

A few minutes later, he opened the old creaking door. The church was almost dark, and as the eyes got used to the semi-darkness, the interior slowly appeared: a long nave, an old stone roof, and a crucifix at the altar in front of a red drape. The large river stones that had been brought up the hill during construction had each been signed with the mark of the old mason who had cut them.

Mr. Condé found the switch, and the rest of the church was suddenly visible.

The damage couldn’t have been more obvious. Years of water seeping into the exterior walls had left long white mineral stains, giving the appearance of a cave interior.

The retablo, the large wooden shelves that rest behind the altar, had been professionally restored, but the humidity threatened them again. It was too late for the 18th century frescoes that once showed scenes from the life of Jesus: only one was fully visible, that of Christ carrying the cross.

“We could still distinguish them when we were children,” said Manolo Brita, a friend of Mr Conde, who had entered behind him.

M. Condé, pointing to the choir near the old rose window, recalled another childhood memory, now long gone for several decades. “I remember when this choir was full of kids,” he said. “It’s not now.”

And that absence, he said, was the real reason the church was collapsing: because the population of the village was shrinking and there was little left to look after it. The population had grown from more than 1,500 when he was young to around 860 today, as part of a rural leak that has plagued villages across Spain.

While the mayor’s report this fall from a “masked restaurateur” sparked furious calls for an investigation to find the culprit, information that later surfaced both complicated the thriller and underscored how long these interventions lasted. wandering women tormented the country.

A local resident, while browsing an aging book on churches in the area, noticed an image that showed the same cement joint on the arch at least as early as 1999, when the investigation was published. With the crime apparently at least two decades old, it seemed impossible to find out who had committed it.

Sitting in his office, Mr Seoane, the mayor, said he regretted if his comments made people think there would be a manhunt for the culprit. But the fact that no one had noticed that the glue had been there for all these years was also telling, he said.

And it wasn’t just the poorly managed cement repair job that was now causing people to do a double take. Who had installed the alarm system which seemed to have been pierced in the ancient stone? Or the bulky electrical conduit sticking out of one of the old windows? He seemed to be there for years, mostly unnoticed.

And why was there a wire mesh covering the rose window, and who had put it there?

The list of impromptu repair work now noticed at the church suddenly seemed endless. But at least the sloppy cement work – and the mayor’s colorful, though fictitious, description of the assailant’s appearance – had caught everyone’s attention, enough that Mr. Seoane thought he finally could. obtain funding to repair other items that needed to be repaired.

“If we don’t do the job this time around,” he said, “I don’t think we’ll ever do it.”

Jose bautista contributed to Castronuño’s reporting.


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Perseverance pays off for college graduates https://myrumah.net/perseverance-pays-off-for-college-graduates/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 23:29:50 +0000 https://myrumah.net/perseverance-pays-off-for-college-graduates/ It WAS a momentous occasion for First City University College (First City UC) as graduates received their well-deserved scrolls at its graduation ceremony in 2021. The 25th annual graduation ceremony held at a hotel in Petaling Jaya, Selangor, was shared with parents and guardians as well as other family and friends. The ceremony celebrated the […]]]>

It WAS a momentous occasion for First City University College (First City UC) as graduates received their well-deserved scrolls at its graduation ceremony in 2021.

The 25th annual graduation ceremony held at a hotel in Petaling Jaya, Selangor, was shared with parents and guardians as well as other family and friends.

The ceremony celebrated the success of the graduates of the Faculty of Design and Built Environment; Faculty of Business, Hospitality and Communication; as well as the Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science.

The graduation ceremony saw the awarding of prizes to graduates of diploma, bachelor’s and postgraduate levels in various disciplines, including business administration, mass communication, hospitality management and hospitality management. tourism, interior design, architecture and interior design, graphic design, electronic engineering, software engineering and information technology.

First City UC Board of Governors Chairman Tan Sri Teo Chiang Kok, Director Tan Sri Teo Chiang Liang and Vice Chancellor Professor Saw Sor Heoh were among the attendees at the event.

In her welcome message, Professor Saw praised the graduates for their persistence and commitment to completing their studies despite the Covid-19 pandemic.

The highlight of the event was the presentation of the “Student of the Year and Excellence Awards”.

Among the recipients of the Excellence Awards was Tew Yong Siang, who graduated with High Honors in the BA (Hons) Interior Architecture and Design program.

On behalf of the graduates, Tew expressed gratitude to all staff for their hard work, professional skills, commitment, dedication and outstanding contributions.

He added that the graduates had achieved one of the major milestones in their lives, one that should be recognized for its importance.

Teh Wei Jie, another recipient of an Honors BA in Interior Architecture and Design, was another recipient of the First Class Honors.

In addition to having excelled in his studies, Teh has also won numerous external awards such as the Gold Award at the International Design Awards 2019 and the Silver Award at the Johor Interior Design Award 2019.

“The program taught me to put theory into practice by applying the ideas and concepts I had learned through various site visits, workshops and tutorials with the speakers,” said Teh, who is currently working as an architect of inside.

“The critical thinking skills cultivated throughout the program have helped me in my work projects, as I am able to deliver ideas and concepts to my clients in a unique way.

“In addition, the communication skills and techniques that I acquired throughout my studies have helped me in my presentations to my manager and to my clients. “

Meanwhile, Liew Yew Jie, who graduated with high honors in the Interior Design and Architecture degree program, said the lecturers were always approachable and helpful.

Liew, design director of his own company, added that the program had helped him expand his knowledge and skills in the areas of design thinking, architecture and design software.

Soh Wei Wei, recipient of the Student of the Year award, who achieved excellent results for the Mass Communication degree program, said that she had learned many useful skills through the program, such as editing and communication skills, which proved to be beneficial for her degree in advertising.

Another recipient of the Student of the Year, Hotel and Tourism Management graduate was Wong Chian Hau.

Wong, who is currently working as a customer service agent, said he had acquired basic practical and theoretical knowledge in the hospitality industry, which made it easier for him to handle the responsibilities and tasks that come with him. entrusted to work.

“The knowledge I gained at First City UC helped me lay a solid foundation for my university studies,” said Mak Yu Wen, also recipient of the Student of the Year award.

She added that the teachers went to extra lengths to guide each student in class.

Mak, a final year student at an Australian university, also said the computer lab facilities and study spaces were excellent.

Amy Lo Lai Voon, a graduate of the Master of Design Management program, is embarking on her career as a lecturer in her alma mater.

Coming from a background in design, Lo said the unique marriage of design and management in the program was perfect as she had the opportunity to gain knowledge about how businesses operate, stakeholder management and the sustainability of a creative company.

She has also found the research modules to be valuable as a lecturer, as they allow her to better understand the topics when preparing for her lectures.

Likewise, Choo Han Lim, a graduate of a master’s degree in software engineering, said that soft skills such as soft skills and research skills are taught to diversify the skills of graduates to prepare them for higher education and professional life.

As a software engineer, Choo is currently managing and leading a project due to his knowledge of project management.

He said: “The project management module is indeed useful in the industry, while the entrepreneurship module puts me above the rest of my peers. “

In addition to praising the campus to provide a new, clean and conducive environment, he advised current students to choose research titles according to their interests in order to carry out their research projects with ease, and also to focus on soft skills, which are in demand in today’s job market.


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