Banyan Tree House / Studio Tales of Design

Banyan Tree House / Studio Tales of Design

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  • Region Area of ​​this architecture project Region :
    2000 ft²

  • Year Year of realization of this architectural project

    Year:


    2022


  • Photographs

  • Manufacturers Marks with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Hettich, Asian Paintings, Greenlam, JOHNSON, Kajaria, capital plywood, So much, it will

  • Main architects:

    Shammi A Shareef

© Turtle Arts Photography
© Turtle Arts Photography

Text description provided by the architects. Located on the banks of a river in Mampully, the Banyan tree house is intended for a young couple and their two children. The land constitutes an area of ​​630 m² and has an interesting L-shaped site profile. The spatial planning of the house follows the profile of the site and is anchored around an existing banyan tree to the west of the site. An 11 foot buffer radius is maintained around the banyan tree for building security, this shaded area houses garden seating. BTH’s ground plates branch out across the site in an angular grid to form a series of interaction spaces and green niches. The spaces are positioned to establish a visual connection between them and the landscape without compromising privacy.

© Turtle Arts Photography
© Turtle Arts Photography
Ground floor Plan
Ground floor Plan
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© Turtle Arts Photography
© Turtle Arts Photography
© Turtle Arts Photography

The three-bedroom home is a one-story structure with a Mezzanine floor and has a built-up area of ​​2000 square feet. The district faces rising waters during peak monsoons due to its proximity to the river. Thus, as a precaution, the built spaces are positioned on the highest point of the raised site. This helped create a large sloping front yard, a buffer zone with native vegetation bearing fruit and flowers to shield house noise and dust from road traffic.

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© Turtle Arts Photography
Section AA
Section AA
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© Turtle Arts Photography

Geometric shapes are carefully rendered in various elements of the design, creating a distinct design language. This visual continuity is established in aspects of the flooring, joinery, interior furnishings, skylights and overall building form. The house envelope with its pilings, slopes, dynamic geometry, and projecting structural slabs lend a sculptural appeal to the home. Slabs projecting to varying degrees from the facade provide shade during summers and rain protection during monsoons. Custom design is the central ideology of BTH, it is reflected on the built-in furniture, the front door handle, the railings, the wall decoration, the artworks and the handcrafted concrete bird. handmade ground cover.

© Turtle Arts Photography
© Turtle Arts Photography

Doors, windows, jali bricks, porotherm air vents and skylights are strategically placed to enhance interior comfort levels through cross ventilation, chimney effect and natural lighting. Natural airflow and lighting help reduce household energy consumption. The interior courtyard becomes part of the dining room and is an additional attraction because the dining room is the circulation core of the house. Space-saving built-in niches are used to house shelves, cabinets and hand washing. The south side of the house has fewer openings and high threshold windows to counter solar heat gain. The full-height windows are mostly north-facing to get more indirect natural light into the interiors.

© Turtle Arts Photography
© Turtle Arts Photography

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